LPB Workshop: Writing a Play for the Edinburgh Fringe

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world. It has provided the springboard for countless successful productions from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to Fleabag. But where does the process of mounting a new play at the Fringe begin?

In 2012, Freddie Machin wrote and performed a one-man show based on the early life of Winston Churchill. Thanks to its exposure at the fringe, he then took the production on a UK tour. Drawing on this experience and looking ahead to Edinburgh 2019, Freddie will lead the group through the process of writing a one-act play, paying specific consideration to the demands of the festival.

The six-week course will also cover the fundamentals of producing a show at Edinburgh to include deadlines, budgets, flyering, reviews, and the future life of your play.

Who’s it for: this course is open to writers of all levels with an interest in the fringe, and will be particularly applicable to those writers considering taking a play of their own to Edinburgh 2019.

Course dates: Thursdays 7pm – 9pm from 20 September 2018 – 25 October 2018 (6 weeks)

Location: Theatre Delicatessen Studios, Broadgate, 2 Finsbury Avenue, London, England, EC2M 2PF (nearest tube: Liverpool Street/ Moorgate)

Cost: £135 non members / £108 members rate

Not a member yet but want to take advantage of the 20% discount on workshop bookings? Read more about joining and sign up and for around the price of a coffee here

How to book:          


Members click here to book through the members site at the reduced rate.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with us at workshops@londonplaywrightsblog.com

Deadline: non applicable, but please be aware that courses are booked on a first come first serve basis and places are very limited!

About the workshop leader

Based on his play of the same title, Freddie Machin wrote the feature film Chicken, which got its UK cinema release in May 2016. Mark Kermode included it in his best films of that year for the Guardian newspaper, and it received its network premiere on FilmFour. Freddie’s other plays include: The Real Estate, Candy Cansino Checks In (Italia Conti), Nailhouse (Old Red Lion), Winston on the Run (Edinburgh Fringe & UK Tour), The Revenge of Martha G. (Chichester Festival Theatre), Don’t Waste Your Bullets on the Dead (Vault Festival), Chicken (Southwark Playhouse). Freddie is a member of the Orange Tree Theatre Writers Collective 2018, and teaches writing for both stage and screen at City Academy. www.freddiemachin.com www.chickenthefilm.com @Freddie_Machin

Image by Dimitry B via Flickr CC 

LPB Workshop: From Stage to Screen

After the success of the taster session of this workshop at London Writers’ Week, playwright, Freddie Machin is back with his practical session on taking your work from stage to screen. This time, he’ll be working with a smaller, more intimate group – so please book early to secure your spot!
From Stage to Screen is a one-off workshop which will explore the challenges presented in writing for these two different media. Drawing on the experience of adapting his debut stage play for screen, Freddie will lead participants through a series of exercises that will engage the visual imagination, highlight good structure, and encourage brevity in your writing.

Who’s it for: this course is open to writers of all levels.

Course date: Saturday 29 September 2018, 10.30am – 1pm

Location: Theatre Delicatessen Studios, Broadgate, 2 Finsbury Avenue, London, England, EC2M 2PF (nearest tube: Liverpool Street/ Moorgate)

Cost: £47 non members/ £37.60 members

Not a member yet but want to take advantage of the 20% discount on workshop bookings? Read more about joining and sign up and for around the price of a coffee here

How to book: 




        

Members click here to book through the members site at the reduced rate.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with us at workshops@londonplaywrightsblog.com

Deadline: non applicable, but please be aware that courses are booked on a first come first serve basis and places are very limited!

About the workshop leader

Based on his play of the same title, Freddie Machin wrote the feature film Chicken, which got its UK cinema release in May 2016. Mark Kermode included it in his best films of that year for the Guardian newspaper, and it received its network premiere on FilmFour. Freddie’s other plays include: The Real Estate, Candy Cansino Checks In (Italia Conti), Nailhouse (Old Red Lion), Winston on the Run (Edinburgh Fringe & UK Tour), The Revenge of Martha G. (Chichester Festival Theatre), Don’t Waste Your Bullets on the Dead (Vault Festival), Chicken (Southwark Playhouse). Freddie is a member of the Orange Tree Theatre Writers Collective 2018, and teaches writing for both stage and screen at City Academy. www.freddiemachin.com www.chickenthefilm.com @Freddie_Machin

Image by Dimitry B via Flickr CC 

LPB Workshop: The Redrafting Programme

Ever wanted the information from a practical workshop paired with individual feedback tailored especially for you? Then look no further than the Redrafting Programme. Led by LPB’s Head of Writer Development, Kimberley Andrews,  this course will give you a masterclass in re-drafting as well as one-to-one feedback, mentoring and a personalised plan of action for editing your play.

Packed full of practical tips, exercises and individual support from Kimberley, this course promises to leave you perfectly equipped to take your play to the next level.

How it works:

Once you’ve booked your place on the course, you’ll need to send your first draft over to us so that Kimberley can read it prior to the first workshop, we’ll need to receive this by the end of September.

Redrafting Masterclass

You’ll attend a group Redrafting Masterclass where you will explore different approaches to redrafting, learn about practical methods to edit your work and gain the tools you need to start re-writing your play.

Individual Tutorials

You’ll be offered a 45 minute tutorial with Kimberley Andrews, who will give you feedback on your script and discuss which areas need the most work.  Kimberley will also provide you with a bullet point redrafting action plan. Tutorials will take place in Central London or by Skype, if preferable.

Troubleshooting Masterclass

After you’ve taken some time to redraft your work, the group will meet again for a troubleshooting masterclass. In this session, you’ll be given the chance to share problematic scenes with the group and explore how to overcome common hurdles within the redrafting process.

Course Dates: 

Redrafting Masterclass:  Saturday 13 October 2018, 2pm-5pm

Individual Tutorials: Saturday 20 October OR Saturday 27 October between 1pm-6pm (please note, individual time slots will be confirmed nearer the time).

Troubleshooting Masterclass: Saturday 17 November 2018, 2pm – 5pm

Location: Theatre Delicatessen Studios, Broadgate, 2 Finsbury Avenue, London, England, EC2M 2PF (nearest tube: Liverpool Street/ Moorgate)

Cost: £200 non members/ £160 members

Not a member yet but want to take advantage of the 20% discount on workshop bookings? Read more about joining and sign up and for around the price of a coffee here

How to book: 


Members click  here to book through the members site at the reduced rate.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with us at workshops@londonplaywrightsblog.com

Deadline: non applicable, but please be aware that courses are booked on a first come first serve basis and places are very limited!

About the workshop leader

Kimberley is a playwright, script consultant and tutor.  She has had work produced at the Birmingham Rep and has developed work with the Manchester Royal Exchange, Wolverhampton University and All the Rage Theatre. She has also written and produced comedy sketch shows at the Hen & Chickens and is currently working on a television project and a novel.

When she’s not writing, she heads up writer development at LPB and works on programming content on workshops to support playwrights in developing their work.  Kimberley  is keen to create exciting opportunities and resources for emerging writers and currently also works as a playwriting tutor at RADA.

Autumn Workshops from London Playwrights’ Blog

We’re thrilled to announce the exciting programme of workshops we’ve got coming your way this Autumn!

Whether you want to get to grips with writing a show for Edinburgh next year or you’d benefit from a re-drafting course with a difference, we’re sure you’re going to want to get your teeth into our latest line-up of workshops, starting this September.

We’re also pleased to tell you that we’ll be offering our members a 20% discount on all workshop bookings! So, if you needed another reason to become a member, this is it! Read more about joining here. 

What’s coming up?

Writing a Play for the Edinburgh Fringe

Thursday evenings, 7pm – 9pm, 20 September 2018 – 25 October 2018 (6 weeks) 

The Edinburgh Festival Fringe is the largest arts festival in the world. It has provided the springboard for countless successful productions from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead to Fleabag. But where does the process of mounting a new play at the Fringe begin? In this 6 week course, Freddie Machin will lead the group through the process of writing a one-act play, paying specific consideration to the demands of the festival. The course will also cover the fundamentals of producing a show at Edinburgh to include deadlines, budgets, flyering, reviews, and the future life of your play. Find out more and book here.

From Stage to Screen

Saturday 29 September 2018 10.30am – 1pm 
Led by playwright and screenwriter Freddie Machin, From Stage to Screen is a one-off practical workshop which will explore the challenges presented in writing for these two different media. Drawing on the experience of adapting his debut stage play for screen, Freddie will lead participants through a series of exercises that will engage the visual imagination, highlight good structure, and encourage brevity in your writing. Find out more and book here.

The Redrafting Programme

Saturday 13 October 2018 2pm – 5pm – Saturday 17 November 2018 (various dates)
Ever wanted the information from a practical workshop paired with individual feedback tailored especially for you? Then look no further than the Redrafting Programme. Led by LPB’s Head of Writer Development, Kimberley Andrews. In this course, you’ll get a masterclass in re-drafting as well as one-to-one feedback, mentoring and a personalised plan of action for redrafting.  Packed full of practical tips, exercises and individual support from Kimberley, this course promises to leave you perfectly equipped to take your play to the next level.  Find out more and book here.
Image by Siaran James via Flickr CC

 

 

Self-Producing: Tips for putting on a new writing night

Writer Samia Djilli shares her experiences of self-producing her own work, and looks into what it takes to create a night of new writing. 

Working in the arts is not an easy feat, especially for emerging artists. As an writer, you often have high expectations of yourself to wake up one day and create that one play that every theatre in town will be waiting to get their hands on. But something you quickly learn from working in the industry is that it isn’t always that simple.

When myself and my production company, Kine Productions, decided to put on a night of new writing, we were conscious that there would be a few variables to overcome. However with enough drive and dedication, self-producing can be one of the most rewarding ways to get your work on a stage. Here’s a few tips on how to do it and a few things to avoid along the way:

1. Work with others

Self-producing work by yourself is quite a daunting prospect, and in terms of budget, not always that plausible. Working with others is the most efficient way to go about putting your work on a stage.

One of the major pluses of working with others is that you’ll get to build a network of people around you and get their perspective on your work. As we all know, tunnel vision is a common side effect of being a writer but working with other creatives is a pretty good antidote.

Although it can be scary to put yourself out there, don’t be afraid to connect within your local community. Fear is one of the biggest things to hold us back but you’ll quickly find that there are plenty of people in the exact same situation as you. Not only that but you’ll get to learn new skills from those you work with and learn more about what you do and don’t enjoy as part of the process of self-producing.

2. Connect online

For a lot of people, the whole creative process of producing can seem alien. When I first started I felt way out of my depth. One thing that helped me was connecting online with theatre communities.

If you don’t know the first thing about putting on a night of new writing, contact your local theatre and ask them if you could come in and have a chat or even tweet them asking a few questions. It may sound simple but you’d be surprised how much clarity you can get simply through outreach alone.Don’t forget to use online resources. There are plenty of blogs, Twitter pages, webinars and Youtube videos all dedicated to educating you in the process of self-producing. With a bit of hunting around you’ll find the right avenue for you and start to build up your knowledge in no time.

3. Don’t be afraid to fail

This one is a hard one and I’ve definitely felt the backlash of when things go wrong. The thing about theatre is that it’s not a solid structure; pieces are always falling off and you’ll find yourself in a constant state of rebuilding. But that is simply the nature of how it works.

The trick is to try and be ready for when things go wrong. It may be that an actor drops out last minute or a director gets sick, these things are all common and they get easier the bigger your network becomes.

It takes practice and I’m still trying to master it myself, but don’t be afraid to get back up if it all falls to the ground.

4. Utilize your resources

One of the biggest struggles in self-producing is, and will always be budget. Having to empty your pockets to get something on a stage is not the biggest highlight of the experience and is something I’ve learnt not to do.

It may seem a little implausible but putting a play on for next to nothing is somewhat doable if you have a good team of people around you. In my experience a good team means people that will come together to use their resources so no one goes home with their pockets hurting.

One of the key things is to know what you want from a production. If you want the show on for a week, crowd fund a year in advance. Or if you want it on for one night, contact a bunch of theatres and see if any of them have a space you can use for a discounted price. With enough get-go you can find a way to make it work. It just takes time and a lot of patience.

There are plenty of things you can do to self-produce but as cliché as it sounds you really have to love what you do in order for it to work. If you enjoy what you’re doing you’ll be more willing to put the work in and in my experience that’s the best way to succeed.

Kine Productions show Remote will debut at Theatre503 Monday 20 August 2018 

You can find tickets here.

Opportunities – Pick of the Week: Applications open for the Old Vic 12

Each week we look through our pile of writing opportunities to pick out one we think is particularly worth your time. It could be an innovative brief, great prize money, a high-profile company, or just plain fun.

This week’s pick: Applications open for the Old Vic 12

Description: The search is on to find the next group of exciting artists to become The Old Vic 12. The Old Vic is looking for three directors, three playwrights, three producers and three exciting collaborators from any discipline: designers, composers, DJs, lighting designers, movement directors, illusionists and everything in-between; if you’re interested in collaboration and new writing, they want to hear from you.

What’s so great about it? if you are a creative who is looking to make a change in their work, whether that’s a step up or the support to go in a new direction, then you won’t want to miss this opportunity from the Old Vic. 12 creatives (including 3 playwrights) will be chosen for a year attachment with the Old Vic, which includes professional mentoring and the chance to work with other creatives and build your network.  The selected 12 will also receive a grant to create and develop three brand new plays to be presented at The Old Vic. Applications are open now until 3 September so make sure you give it a go if you’re looking to take your work to the next level!

Read the full details here

Please note, we’ve posted this for your convenience and we’re not affiliated with the organisers of the opportunity.

Photo courtesy of Old VIc

Fitzroy House seeking writers for first professional season

Fitzroy House is currently planning their first professional season, forming a Rep Company and searching for exciting writers to commission.
In the coming year in order to find actors, directors and writers to work with they will be holding a number of events such as this one. This way, they feel we can get a real understanding of how the artists work and form a strong supportive ensemble.
Any work entered into their Scratch/New Writing Nights will be considered for professional development for their summer season next year.
How to apply: send your work to daniel.grimston@icloud.com (no more than ten pages).
Deadline: 27 August 2018
Source: Playwriting UK Facebook Group

From Page to Stage at the Arcola Theatre (course, £95)

Arcola invites playwrights to elevate their work and hone their style. From Page To Stage will enable early-career playwrights to look critically at their drafted work in preparation for performance.

Each two hour session will provide tools and exercises for writers to go beyond their usual practice, providing them with a supportive and dynamic environment in which to test out their ideas. The course will touch on editing, dramaturgy, and how to redraft with actors and directors for performance.

There will be opportunities for writers to share their work and hear extracts read aloud; with peer-to-peer feedback and open discussion providing a basis for script development.

This workshop is led by playwright, producer and comedian Rebecca Jones.

Course dates:  28 August – 2nd October (Tuesdays, 8pm – 10pm)

Cost: £95

How to book: here

Deadline: not applicable

Source: Playwriting UK Facebook Group

Applications open for the Old Vic 12

The search is on to find the next group of exciting artists to become The Old Vic 12.

The Old Vic 12 is a group of 12 extraordinary developing artists ready to take the next step in their careers. The scheme provides opportunities to expand their networks, receive first class mentoring and benefit from a prestigious association with The Old Vic through an attachment to this iconic building. The selected 12 will also receive a grant to create and develop three brand new plays to be presented at The Old Vic.

The Old Vic is looking for three directors, three playwrights, three producers and three exciting collaborators from any discipline: designers, composers, DJs, lighting designers, movement directors, illusionists and everything in-between; if you’re interested in collaboration and new writing, they want to hear from you.

Who can apply: the successful applicants will be creatives looking to make a change in their work, whether that’s a step up or the support to go in a new direction. Applicants should be creating their own work on the fringe, assisting established practitioners or working at the equivalent level, and feel that they would benefit from a structured year and attachment to an independent producing theatre.

Successful applicants currently based outside of London will be eligible for support with travel and accommodation. We will also work with you to make sure any access needs are met and that you can make the most out of the opportunity.

How to apply: check out the full details and apply here.

Deadline: 3 September 2018 at 12pm

Source: direct contact