YEP Young Everyman Playhouse Writers Two-Year Programme (Liverpool, age 18-25)

Young Everyman Playhouse is open for applications to join their two year writers programme. In this programme you will:

  • Learn the fundamentals of playwriting such as character, structure and narrative
  • Work with professional playwrights and theatre practitioners
  • Read and discuss plays as a group
  • Write monologues, short plays and try out ideas
  • Develop a new, full length play with one-to-one support from the Literary Department
  • Collaborate with other YEP strands to develop ideas.

Eligibility: 18-25 years old. Please note that sessions take place in Liverpool.

How to apply: Complete the online application form. All applications should be sent to: yep@everymanplayhouse.com.

What to submit: A monologue or short scene between three and ten pages long. It can be about anything you like, but should be written for performance.

Deadline: 2 September 2016

Source: PlaywritingUK Facebook page

 

Opportunities: Our Pick of the Week – Brave New Word accepting short pieces for ‘Break Up Britain’

Each week we look through our pile of writing opportunities to pick out one we think is particularly worth your time. It could be an innovative brief, great prize money, a high-profile company, or just plain fun.

This week’s pick: Brave New Word accepting short pieces for ‘Break Up Britain’

Description: Brave New Word brings actors, writers, and directors together to experiment with new work. They are currently seeking submissions for their September event inspired by Brexit.

What’s so great about it? Brave New Word particularly encourages first time writers, and submissions are only five minutes in length, so if you’re in the early stages of building your playwriting career this is an ideal opportunity. Also, if you found yourself with more ideas than you could use for our recent Pick of the Week featuring Little Pieces of Gold’s Brexit callout, this is an opportunity to develop another another idea on this theme. (Note that the length requirements are different for the two evenings, so you won’t want to submit the same piece to both opportunities.) Submissions close on 5 September at 9am, so time to hop to it if you want to submit!

Read the full details here.

Please note, we’ve posted this for your convenience and we’re not affiliated with the organisers of the opportunity.

(Image Credit: photographymontreal via Flickr Commons CC Licence)

Page To Stage seeking 10-minute scripts for rehearsed readings (£10 fee if selected)

Page to Stage are inviting writers to submit a NEW 10-minute scripts (or excerpt of a longer script) to be rehearsed by actors and directors, then shared and given feedback by an industry panel.

The next Page to Stage is on Wednesday 21 September at The Horse & Stables, London SE1 7RW.

What to submit: Scripts should have 2-4 characters, and be suitable for performance as a rehearsed reading in a small playing area. The actors who apply to Page to Stage always comprise more female than  male, with a broad range.

What you pay: A fee of £10 is collected from each writer on the night, to help with running the event.

How to apply:

  1. Email Miranda Harrison to request the short submission form and further details. Email address: Page2Stage@gmx.com
  2. Send the completed form plus your script to the same email address.

Deadline: 4 September 2016

Source: Direct Contact

 

Pursued By A Bear: “I’m trying to write my biog and it sucks”

Pursued By A Bear is our weekly advice column with playwright Adam Taylor.  He’ll tackle your playwriting questions – from practical issues to existential dilemmas – relying on nothing but his bare wits, brute strength, and questionable personal experiences.

“I haven’t done loads, at least in my opinion, but more and more I’m doing things where people ask me for my biog. I really, really hate writing this. I feel like I’m bigging myself up, but if I try to underplay things then I look like an inexperienced idiot. I’m terrible at self-promotion. Any biog tips for people who hate talking about themselves?”

I know exactly how you feel. Writing your own biography feels like an impossible task; if you undercook it you’ll look like an amateur but if you overdo it people will think you’re a self-serving blowhard or assume you’re lying.

It’s especially difficult at the beginning of your career because you don’t have a lot of options. If you only put in the really impressive stuff your biog will be nothing more than a snappy one-liner. You’re forced to put in every little project you’ve done, which means trying to make that primary school nativity play sound like a professional job. Which it definitely wasn’t.

It’s cliched advice, but I’ve always thought honesty is the best policy when it comes to biogs. As a playwright on the upward trajectory of a fledgling career, people aren’t expecting you to have lit up the West End or written a monologue for Dame Judy Dench.

The key point to remember when writing your biog is that the vast majority of playwrights started out without a credit to their name. There are very few shortcuts; careers are built from nothing.

It’s okay to be inexperienced.

Don’t get caught up with struggling to pad out your biog or make every project look like The Phantom of the Opera. Depending on where you are, you may have some leeway to pick the best of the bunch from your past projects. In most cases you only need a couple of paragraphs or 100-150 words.

One rule I try to stick to is not putting in names of my plays. At this stage it’s likely the reader hasn’t heard of your play, so unless it was big enough to be easily googled you’re wasting words by including the title. Stick to the names of theatres you’ve performed at; “Laetitia Baines-Wolcroft has had her work performed at The Royal Court and Soho Theatre.”

If you’ve had work on in theatres people will have heard of it’s definitely worth mentioning these. However, a full run in a less-known theatre is probably more significant than a rehearsed reading of that ten minute monologue you wrote for writers’ night at the Old Vic. Use your own judgment to decide which projects to include and prioritise.

Another useful tip is to keep it factual. Write in the third person and simply list your accomplishments in straightforward language. Most people reading your biog will be sitting in the audience at one of your shows or a writers’ night and reading it from the programme solely to find out if you’ve done anything they might have heard of. If they don’t recognise any of your work it doesn’t really matter because they’re about to watch your new show.

You’ll sometimes come across a jokey, comedic or self-effacing biog from a writer. Although I have occasionally got a laugh out of one of these, I wouldn’t recommend writing one because typically they don’t serve the purpose of a real biog; to let readers know what you’ve actually done. In my opinion it’s best to save the jokes for the play and keep the biog factual.

Writing a self-effacing biog which pokes fun at your achievements can seem like a way to get around your self-consciousness at bragging. Don’t be tempted to take this route though because it can often be more transparent than you’d think. You run the risk of belittling what you’ve accomplished, and while it may not feel that impressive to you at this stage, to another aspiring writer in the audience you might be a superstar. Secondly, joking about your past work can sometimes come across as flippant, or worse, arrogant. You don’t want to alienate your audience with a misunderstood biog joke.

If you’re really cringing at the prospect of blowing your own trumpet in biog form, consider outsourcing. Hopefully most of you have other friends who write, or at the very least know someone with a GCSE in English. Why not make a you-write-mine-and-I’ll-write-yours deal with another playwright? You’ll often find your friends are more eager to talk about your work than you are, let them do it in biog form. Asking someone who enjoys your work to write a couple of paragraphs about it isn’t unreasonable as favours go.

This is a no-brainer but the absolute bare minimum you should do is have someone proof your biography. I don’t think readers will be judging your worth as a playwright by the projects you’ve done in the past, but people can be really fickle when it comes to typos. Don’t rely on whoever’s putting together the programme to proof your work because for all you know this person is an intern working two jobs on top of handling admin, social media, laundry and script-reading for the theatre. Ask someone you trust to glance through your biog before sending it off. If anything, you’ll look like an idiot if you spell the name of a theatre wrong.

Once you’ve written that first biography it becomes a matter of maintenance. Each time you do something new remember to update your biog. Weigh up your new project against what’s already in there and make a choice as to whether you bump something else off to make room. Sometimes this will be a difficult decision but don’t be tempted to keep adding projects. You don’t want your biog to snowball into a lengthy essay because it will inevitably be too long when you do need to submit it somewhere.

If you keep the biog around the same length and make regular updates you’ll find it becomes a much easier task. When someone asks for your biog you’ll have it ready. Just give it a quick once-over to be sure it’s still doing you justice and send it off. It’s a good idea to always save a new version when updating because you never know when you might want to revert to a previous one.

In the digital age it’s also possible to keep multiple versions. Say you write tense dramas and musical comedies, why not have a separate biog for each genre? This way you can tailor your profile to each audience. People interested in musical theatre may well be more interested in other musicals you’ve written than they are in your dramas. I realise I’m telling you to write multiple biographies when you’re struggling to write one but, as with most things, practice makes perfect.

The best piece of advice I can give is not to big yourself up or try to underplay things. Just be honest. Keep it factual, and remember most people reading your biog will be curious more than anything. Don’t think of the biog as a piece of evidence on which your value will be judged, it’s more of a signpost pointing to your work. The work is the part on which your reputation rests.

Keep the biog simple, don’t overthink it. Let your work speak for you.

Have a question or problem you’d like to send in?  Email advice@londonplaywrightsblog.com and keep your eyes peeled to see if the answer turns up on our site!

(DISCLAIMER: If you send us a question, you’re giving us permission to publish it!  Be sure to indicate what name you’d like us to use as a sign-off when we publish your column, and a just a heads up that we reserve the right to edit submissions for length if needed.)

Photo credit: Tambako the Jaguar via CC license

Opportunities Weekly Round-up: 26 August 2016

Our weekly Friday round-up of opportunities listed on the blog that haven’t yet reached their closing date (listed in order of closing date).  Opportunities are grouped into four sections: 1) Pick of the Week & featured posts; 2) Opportunities with Deadlines; 3) Workshops and Events; 4) Ongoing opportunities (No deadline).

Want to be sure you never miss an opportunity?  Sign up for our email list to get the weekly roundup direct to your inbox!

Our latest opportunities Pick of the Week: Dionysian Magazine seeking play submissions

This Week in our Advice Column, Pursued By A Bear: “Should I limit scene changes to get my play produced?”

Coming up with London Playwrights’ Workshop:

Autumn 2016 Workshops from London Playwrights’ Blog

Creative Inspiration for Playwrights: A Practical Workshop Saturday 24 September 2016 from 10am-12pm

Intro to Script Formatting: Tips & Tricks for a Professional-Looking Script – Saturday 24 September 2016 from 12-1pm

How To Write Short Plays That Win – Saturday 24 September 2016 from 2-5pm

Intensive Workshop: Mastering Microstructure – Thursday 6 October 7pm-9pm

Intensive Workshop: Writing Compelling Dialogue – Thursday 20 October 7pm-9pm

Intensive Workshop: Making an Impact in Your Opening Scene – Thursday 3 November 2016 7pm-9pm

Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A day-long introduction – Saturday 12 November 2016 from 10.30am – 5pm

Opportunities with deadlines:

Play Submissions Helper – 50 playwriting competitions with September deadlines

 

Bush Theatre seeking Associate Dramaturg – Deadline: 26 August 2016 at noon

Free R&D space at Diorama for BAMER theatre companies – Deadline: 26 August 2016

Betty Box and Peter Rogers Comedy Writing Programme 2016 – Deadline: 26 August 2016

60 minute slots available to showcase work at Studio Salford Development Week – Deadline: 26 August 2016

Actor Awareness seeking 15-minute plays on theme of ‘Identity’ (must self-produce, paid) – Deadline: 28 August 2016

Old Vic 12 open for applications (£5,000 commission) – Deadline: 30 August 2016

VAULT Festival open to applications – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Dionysian Magazine seeking play submissions – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Shore Screenwriting Competition 2016 (up to £2,000 cash prize, £25-£35 entry fee) – Regular deadline: 31 July 2016; Late deadline: 31 August 2016

2016 Terence Rattigan Society Award (£10 entry fee, £2,500 prize) – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Monologues and short plays sought for charity event for NYC Foundling – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Directors Cut seeking 5-10 minute responses for Southwark Playhouse Showcase – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Sultan Padamsee Award for Playwriting 2016 – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Ignition Playwriting Competition from Ignite Theatre (£100 prize) -Deadline: 1 September 2016

Applications open for Playwright/Playread at Actors’ Temple – Deadline: 1 September 2016

Soho Young Company open to applications for 11-30 year olds interested in comedy, theatre, or playwriting – Deadline: 2 September 2016

BBC seeking two Script Editors for EastEnders – Deadline: 2 September 2016

Stitchin’ Fiction seeking submissions for September event – Deadline: 4 September 2016

Brave New Word accepting short pieces for ‘Break-Up Britain’ – Deadline: 5 September 2016

Orange Tree Theatre accepting applications for Writers Collective – Deadline: 5 September 2016

Research & Development Residencies with artsdepot – Deadline: 5 September 2016

Little Pieces of Gold Seeking Ten Minute Plays on the Subject of ‘Brexit’ –  Deadline: 7 September 2016

Park Theatre Script Accelerator Programme– Deadline: 7 September 2016

Live Lab Bursary 2016 seeking innovative approaches to text-based performance (£2000) – Deadline: 18 September 2016

StageWrite 2017 playwriting competition (open to Bedfordshire students only)- Deadline: 30 September 2016

Adam Morley and Actor Awareness bursary for writers – Deadline: 30September 2016

Bush Theatre opens script window to accept new plays – Deadline: 30 September 2016

Bread & Roses Playwriting Award 2016 – Deadline: 30 September 2016

Call for Proposals for The Space’s Spring Season – Deadline: 30 September 2016

Pint-Sized seeking 10-15 minute submissions – Deadline: 1 October 2016

Red Dragonfly New Writing Competition 2016 (Asian writers, £1000 prize) – Deadline: 1 October 2016

MT Pockets Theatre seeking submissions for 10 Minute Play Festival 2017 (West Virginia) – Deadline: 1 October 2016

Write to Play Seeking D/deaf or disabled Midlands based Writers (Paid) – Deadline: 3 October 2016

Pub Theatre Festival Seeking Submissions from Emerging Theatre Makers – Deadline: Friday 28 October 2016

Constance Cox Playwriting Competition from Sussex Playwrights’ Club (£7 entry fee, £150 prize) – Deadline: 31 October 2016

Writers required for La Musa Sulla Nuvola – The Muse on the Cloud – Deadline: 20 December 2016

365 Women A Year Playwriting Project open to submissions throughout 2016 – Deadline: 31 December 2016

Polemic Theatre Company accepting submissions for festival – Deadline: 1 January 2017 at 12.01am

Events and workshops: 

Six Week Course on Comedy Writing Skills at Camden Comedy Club (£120) – 3 September – 8 October

September Playwriting Retreat in Kerala, India – 8-14 September 2016

Storylab Evening Class (£215 fee) – 15 September – 1 December 2016

LPB Workshop: Creative Inspiration for Playwrights: A Practical Workshop – Saturday 24 September 2016 from 10am-12pm

LPB Workshop:  Intro to Script Formatting: Tips & Tricks for a Professional-Looking Script – Saturday 24 September 2016 from 12-1pm

LPB Workshop:  How to Write Short Plays That Win – Saturday 24 September 2016 from 2-5pm

Writer’s Mutual Retreat in Bordeaux – 26 September – 2 October

LPB Workshop:  Intensive Workshop: Mastering Microstructure – Thursday 6 October 7pm-9pm

Applications open to join the Writers Club of Directors Cut (£70/term) – Starts early October 2016

LPB Workshop:  Intensive Workshop: Writing Compelling Dialogue – Thursday 20 October 7pm-9pm

Arvon Course – Writing For Puppetry: Writing The Impossible – – 

Free Theatre Making/Writing Workshop at Hackney Museum – 27 October 2016

LPB Workshop:  Intensive Workshop: Making an Impact in Your Opening Scene – Thursday 3 November 2016 7pm-9pm

LPB Workshop:  Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A Daylong Introduction –  Saturday 12 November 2016 from 10.30am – 5pm

Arvon Course – Musical Theatre: Using music and lyrics to tell the tale – – 

Ongoing submissions:

Paines Plough accepting ongoing submissions – Deadline: rolling

BBC Comedy Classroom – Comedy writing resources for young people – various deadlines

Online Masterclass with Aaron Sorkin on Screenwriting ($90) – no deadline

JW3 seeking submissions of pieces about Jewish culture – rolling

BFI Postroom open to submissions of films and scripts from emerging filmmakers – rolling

Writers’ Mutual writing group – Wednesdays 11am-1pm

Opportunities to hear your play with Player Playwrights – Ongoing submissions

Online Playwriting Course with Live Theatre (£95-£495) – rolling

Playwrights Circle at the Bread & Roses – Ongoing (monthly event)

The Institute of Other seeking creative practitioners – Deadline: none posted

White Hart Trust Studios seeking international and foreign language theatre – Deadline: none posted

Pokfulam Rd Productions looking for playwrights and creatives – Deadline: none posted

55 Kings Contemporary Theatre Productions looking for writers – Deadline: none posted

Plane Paper Theatre call out for plays – Deadline: none posted

Theatrelab seeking scripts to perform at ‘WordPlay’ at Bath Spa University – Deadline: none posted

Londonville Lit offering reading slots – Deadline: none posted

Madam Renards Mini Fringe Festival Swindon open for applications from writers and performers – Deadline: none posted (festival takes place in 2016)

Orange Tea Theatre accepting submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Funding available for students at Glasgow University MLitt Playwriting & Dramaturgy – Deadline: None posted

Everything Theatre accepting plays for podcast readings – Deadline: None posted

The Cockpit Theatre seeking work for scratch nights – No deadline posted but performances take place on the first Monday of the month.

Shred Productions open to submissions – Deadline: None (open submissions)

Poppy Seed – accepting submissions of 5 minute scripts for blog – Deadline: None posted

COG ARTSpace call out for playwrights! – Deadline: None

Autumn 2016 Workshops from London Playwrights’ Blog!

The autumn workshops are here! Whether you’re curious about how to format a script, want to craft killer dialogue, or want to improve your hit rate when sending out shot plays, we’ve got something for you.

We’ll also be offering two free workshops as a thank you to all the fantastic writers who submitted scripts for the Dark Horse Festival and who read our blog on an ongoing basis.

Please note that booking for all courses is handled on a rolling basis, so its best to apply early to ensure your spot if you’d like to take part. And do keep an eye on on our Workshops listings, as we may add new courses for later in the season.

(A.C. Smith will not be running an ongoing series this Autumn due to professional commitments. However, we are making up for this with increased slots for one-to-one support – click for more information if you’re interested in booking a script consulting session.)

Free Workshops

Creative Inspiration for Playwrights: A Practical Workshop
Saturday 24 September 2016 from 10am-12pm

This two-hour intensive will get the creative juices flowing! There will be chance to do some spontaneous writing, share your work with other members of the group and get constructive feedback on your ideas.

Intro to Script Formatting: Tips & Tricks for a Professional-Looking Script
Saturday 24 September 2016 from 12-1pm

Getting the formatting right on your script can seem like a minefield, especially with the wealth of software available these days. In this workshop, LPB’s A.C. Smith and Kimberley Andrews will blitz through the rules of formatting your stage play and explain how to get your script submission ready.

Getting Your Work Onstage

Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A day-long introduction
Saturday 12 November 2016 from 10.30am – 5pm

For a playwright, having the power to get your work onstage is the greatest gift you can give yourself to develop your writing and get your work seen. And it’s not as hard as you think! These real tips from playwright/producers who have done it themselves will set you on the right track to make your play happen.

Creative Workshops

How To Write Short Plays That Win – with A.C. Smith
Saturday 24 September 2016 from 2-5pm

This intensive half-day session will look at how to write a stand-out short play. Through examples and interactive exercises, participants will develop their own play ideas, leaving the workshop ready to write.

Intensive Workshop: Mastering Microstructure – with Kimberley Andrews
Thursday 6 October 7pm-9pm 

Dramatic storytelling is dependent on believable build within and between scenes. This practical session will look at how to make the most of action (and the element of surprise!) helping writers develop a project of their choice.

Intensive Workshop: Writing Compelling Dialogue – with Kimberley Andrews
Thursday 20 October 7pm-9pm 

This interactive session will share dialogue-writing techniques and use practical exercises to help you sharpen your dialogue and make the most from every line.

Intensive Workshop: Making an Impact in Your Opening Scene – with Kimberley Andrews
Thursday 3 November 2016 7pm-9pm 

The first few pages of a script are critical to get a reader hooked on your story – and keep them turning the pages. You will learn the best techniques to open with a bang, and have the opportunity to share their own work and craft a killer opening scene.

Photo credit: Paul Bica via Flickr Commons CC Licence

Autumn Kick-Off: Two Free Workshops from London Playwrights Blog!

We’ve had brilliant experiences connecting with writers this year through our workshops, blog, script consulting – and most importantly through the Dark Horse Festival that took place this summer during our partnership with London Writers’ Week!

As a thank you to all the fantastic writers who sent scripts our way, we’re really excited to be able to offer you not one, but two FREE workshops this autumn!

We’ve taken on board feedback from our readers and previous workshop participants to bring you two super useful workshops that will help you hone in on both your professional and creative skills.

Both workshops will take place in September, kicking off our Autumn series of workshops, and are suitable for playwrights of all levels (absolute beginners included).

All you need to do to book is click the links below… but, be quick! Places are limited and are strictly on a first come first serve basis!

Creative Inspiration for Playwrights: A Practical Workshop

When: Saturday 24 September 2016 from 10am-12pm

Where: Diorama Arts Studios, 201 Drummond Street, London, NW1 3FE (nearest tube: Warren Street/Euston Square)

Never stare at a blank page again! This two-hour intensive workshop will get your creative juices flowing and leave you armed with a set of inspirational tools to boost your creativity when writing at home.

In this interactive session, workshop leaders Kimberley Andrews and  A.C. Smith will share with you the extensive stash of practical writing exercises they’ve picked up during their lives as workshop participants, playwrights, tutors and workshop leaders.  There’ll be chance to do some spontaneous writing, share your work with other members of the group and get constructive feedback on your ideas.

Preparation: none, just bring what you need to take notes – and be prepared to share your work in a group setting.

How to book: Please book your place through Eventbrite.

Intro to Script Formatting: Tips & Tricks for a Professional-Looking Script

When: Saturday 24 September 2016 from 12-1pm

Where: London (Zone 1/2) – location TBC

Final Draft or Word? How much space should you leave between lines? How much information should you include in stage directions?

Getting the formatting right on your script can seem like a minefield, especially with the wealth of software available these days. It seems like there are a set of unwritten rules a writer must follow, but how do you know what they are when even the formatting in published plays can vary so much?

The fact is, the way you format can be the difference between you communicating your ideas effectively or confusing your reader or even coming across as unprofessional.  Being confident in how you format can help you creatively too: get the layout right and not only will you save time, you’ll also give yourself a coherent script for re-drafting.

In this workshop, LPB’s A.C. Smith and Kimberley Andrews will blitz through the rules of formatting your stage play and explain how to get your script submission ready. As experienced playwrights, script-readers and playwriting tutors, they both know what makes a script easy to read and they’ll be sharing their knowledge with you in this session.

Preparation: none, just what you need to take notes.

How to book: Please book your place through Eventbrite.

About the Workshop Leaders

A.C. Smith is a scriptwriter and songwriter.  She is a Playwriting Tutor on the MA Text & Performance at RADA, where she previously served as Head of Academic Studies.  She has won awards for her writing from the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Soho Theatre, and has also been shortlisted for the Kevin Spacey Foundation Artists of Choice Awards and the Perfect Pitch Award as a lyricist/librettist for musical theatre.  Her writing has been performed at the Soho Theatre, HighTide, RADA, Southwark Playhouse, Theatre503, and Pleasance Theatre, among others. She has worked at First Born Films as Development Executive, working on new feature film projects, and has worked as a writer/dramaturg with physical theatre & dance projects with Theatre Re and Jorge Crecis. She is Co-Founder & Director of London Playwrights’ Blog.www.ac-smith.com.

Kimberley Andrews is a playwright with an MA in Text & Performance Studies from RADA/ Kings College London. Her writing credits include commissions from the Birmingham Repertory Theatre and Wolverhampton University. She has also developed work with the Manchester Royal Exchange and All the Rage Theatre. Kimberley has written and produced her own work at the Hen & Chickens Theatre in Islington as part of comedy collective, Wet Lettuce. She was shortlisted for the BBC Drama Writers’ Academy in 2012 and was then selected by BBC to participate in a training academy for day-time soap Doctors, resulting in writing a trial script for the show. Kimberley has worked as a playwriting tutor at RADA and currently works as a freelance script consultant.

Photo Credit: Image by Rocco Julie via Flickr Commons CC License

Curious about our other workshops?  Check out the full listings here!

Intensive Workshop: Writing Compelling Dialogue

How do you write great dialogue? How can you communicate information about our characters without writing ‘on the nose’? What should be left unsaid…

Kimberley Andrews leads this intensive two-hour workshop designed to sharpen your dialogue skills! This fun, interactive session consists of practical exercises  which will allow you to tune your ears to natural speech patterns and explore how dialogue functions within and serves your story. You’ll learn to be a rigorous editor and to make sure every line in your play is doing its job.

Who is this for? This workshop is suitable for both completely new and emerging writers with a bit more experience.

Requirements: No experience is necessary but you will need to bring in a short preparatory exercise which will be specified once you have booked your place.

Book here: 

Pay Now Button

*Places are limited and are reserved on a  strictly first come first serve basis, so early booking is advised.

Date and time: Thursday 20 October 7pm-9pm 

Location: RADA Studios (Studio 7), 16 Chenies St, London WC1E 7EX (nearest tube: Goodge Street)

Cost: £27

Kimberley Andrews is a playwright with an MA in Text & Performance Studies from RADA/ Kings College London. Her writing credits include commissions from the Birmingham Repertory Theatre and Wolverhampton University. She has also developed work with the Manchester Royal Exchange and All the Rage Theatre. Kimberley has written and produced her own work at the Hen & Chickens Theatre in Islington as part of comedy collective, Wet Lettuce. She was shortlisted for the BBC Drama Writers’ Academy in 2012 and was then selected by BBC to participate in a training academy for day-time soap Doctors, resulting in writing a trial script for the show. Kimberley has worked as a playwriting tutor at RADA and currently works as a freelance script consultant.

Image by Paul Sableman via Creative Commons CC Licence 

Curious about our other workshops?  Check out the full listings here!

Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A day-long introduction (LPW Workshop)

Does the idea of self-producing your play leave you feeling confused?  Inexperienced?  Even terrified?  Don’t worry – it’s not as hard as it seems!

This day-long workshop will give participants the confidence, practical skills, and troubleshooting insight to successfully produce their own work.

Why should I self-produce?

While a few lucky writers are fortunate enough to find theatres eager to produce their work at the beginning of their careers, the vast majority need to find other ways to get their work onstage: to build their careers and gain the valuable experience of seeing their writing performed.

In our experience, writers tend to be a bit more intimidated by self-producing than directors or other creatives, but this need not be so!  Self-producing takes hard work, but it’s incredibly empowering to realise that you don’t need to win a major award or get a big commission to see your work onstage – you have the skills to make this happen right now.

About the workshop

The workshop covers the core information you need to know to get your play on in a theatre, including:

  • Approaching venues (which theatres to approach, how to write query emails, pitching your project, and negotiating your contract)
  • Budgeting and fundraising (how to generate and manage a budget, crowdfunding, grants, Arts Council funding, and sponsorships)
  • Building your creative team, including casting (how to create a casting call and structure auditions/interviews, where to advertise and find the right people, navigating the rehearsal process, and tips for managing your relationships with other creatives)
  • Publicity and industry outreach (developing a marketing plan, designing flyers and other marketing materials, social media advertising, and inviting agents, theatres, and reviewers)
  • Time management and the key stages of self-producing (a step-by-step walkthrough of your key milestones, setting priorities, and troubleshooting common problems for new producers)

Through a combination of interactive exercises, sharing information and case studies, the workshop will connect playmakers to the resources that will enable them to see their project through to conclusion.  The workshop is focused on playwrights, but is open to any theatremakers who are interested in producing their own work.

All participants will be given detailed handouts they can use for reference after the course.  Although the day will be information-intensive, the approach will be friendly and encouraging, and will be equally welcoming to people from all backgrounds, with plenty of time devoted to answering questions.

Who this workshop is for

This workshop is targeted at people taking their first steps into self-producing, or who have self-produced their work in a limited way but are looking to expand their knowledge in this area, or want more confidence in pitching their work.  Whether you have a specific project already in mind, or are just starting to brainstorm the possibilities, this workshop will leave you better equipped to bring your work to life onstage.

Feedback from previous participants:

“Dense in information, very engaging and oh-so-practical!  Inspired to create and produce more work now.”

“So much was covered with examples and useful anecdotes.”

When and where

When:  Saturday 12 November 2016 from 10.30am – 5pm

Where: Theatre Delicatessen Studios, 30 Marsh Wall, London, E14 9TP (nearest tube: Canary Wharf)

Cost:  £90 for the full day workshop (lunch not included)

How to book

Please click the link below to book your place:

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Places are reserved on a  strictly first come first serve basis, so early booking is advised.

About the Workshop Leaders

The workshop is led by the co-founders of London Playwrights’ Blog, Kimberley Andrews and A.C. Smith, both of whom have personal experience successfully producing their own creative projects, in addition to their other work as playwrights. They also produced the Dark Horse Festival which took place as part of London Writers’ Week 2016 with funding from Arts Council England.

Kimberley Andrews has written an ongoing introductory series on how to produce your own work, focusing on fringe venues in London; she has co-produced several of her own projects at venues including the Hen & Chickens and Rich Mix Studios.  As a writer, she has worked with BBC Drama Writers’ Academy and as a Playwriting Tutor at RADA, among other projects.

A.C. Smith has self-produced work at venues including Theatre503, RADA, Rose Theatre Bankside, The Pheasantry, and as part of Barlow & Smith also crowdfunded and self-produced an album of original songs. As a writer, she has won awards from the RSC and Soho Theatre, and previously worked at RADA as Head of Academic Studies.

Photo credit: Wonderlane via Flickr Commons (CC Licence)

Curious about our other workshops?  Check out the full listings here!

How To Write Short Plays That Win – LPW Workshop

Are you writing and sending out short plays without the success you had hoped? Do you want to take your craft of writing short plays to the next level?

During this intensive half-day session, LPB Director & Playwright A.C. Smith will lead a practical workshop in the art of the short play, drawing on her experience of winning short play competitions from the RSC and Soho Theatre.

Many writers at the beginning of their careers start with short plays, and with good reason – this form is ideal for developing craft and creativity. And as seen every week on this blog, there are a large number of opportunities for short pieces, making it much easier to get your work produced and get the experience of seeing your writing onstage.

There is no formula for writing the perfect short play, but there are tips and tricks to help you get the most out of this form. This workshop will examine what makes a great short play, and how to help your work stand out from the crowd. The workshop will culminate with a creative exercise where you put these ideas to work practically, developing the framework for an exciting short piece that is uniquely you.

(Please note that this workshop is focused on the creative and artistic process of writing short plays, and will not cover script formatting & submission. If you’d like to cover this topic, we recommend booking for our Intro To Script Formatting workshop which be offered free of charge earlier on the same day.)

Who this workshop is for

This workshop is open to all.  Please bring a notebook and pen.

There is no need to prepare anything in advance, but if there is a short play writing opportunity you would like to write for, you are encouraged to bring a copy of the brief with you. (Please be sure to choose an opportunity you have NOT yet started writing for, as we will be starting from the brainstorming stage.)

When and where

Date and time: Saturday 24 September 2016 from 2-5pm

Venue:  Diorama Arts Studios, 201 Drummond Street, London, NW1 3FE (nearest tube: Warren Street/Euston Square)

Cost: £41

How to book

Please click the link below to book your place:

Pay Now Button

Places are reserved on a  strictly first come first serve basis, so early booking is advised.

About the Workshop Leader

A.C. Smith is a scriptwriter and songwriter.  She is a Playwriting Tutor on the MA Text & Performance at RADA, where she previously served as Head of Academic Studies.  She has won awards for her writing from the Royal Shakespeare Company and the Soho Theatre, and has also been shortlisted for the Kevin Spacey Foundation Artists of Choice Awards and the Perfect Pitch Award as a lyricist/librettist for musical theatre.  Her writing has been performed at the Soho Theatre, HighTide, RADA, Southwark Playhouse, Theatre503, and Pleasance Theatre, among others. She is currently a member of the Bush Theatre’s Emerging Writers Group. She has worked at First Born Films as Development Executive, working on new feature film projects, and has worked as a writer/dramaturg with physical theatre & dance projects with Theatre Re, Ciemulator Dance Theatre, and Jorge Crecis. She is Co-Founder & Director of London Playwrights’ Blog. www.ac-smith.com.

Photo Credit: Sean MacEntee via Flickr Commons CC License

Curious about our other workshops?  Check out the full listings here!