Winner of Kenneth Branagh Award announced – and call for directors!

Three winners of the Windsor Fringe’s Kenneth Branagh Drama Award for New Writing, 2016, have been announced!

Congratulations go to Jacky Daly for ‘The Space Between’, David Hendon for ‘Eyes to the Wind’ and Eleanor Clare for ‘Jameson & Son. Funeral Services Since 1888’.

Organisers said judges were impressed with the high standard of writing and told us that two out of the three winners heard of the opportunity through BBC Writersroom. The three winning works will be staged on Oct 6th, 7th and 8th in Windsor and the ‘overall’ winner will be announced after the last performance…

Windsor Fringe is now looking for directors… But you have to be quick! Find out more on their facebook page!

Opportunities: Our Pick of the Week – London Writers’ Week: Events for Writers

Each week we look through our pile of writing opportunities to pick out one we think is particularly worth your time. It could be an innovative brief, great prize money, a high-profile company, or just plain fun.

This week’s pick: London Writers’ Week: Events for Writers

Description: London Writers’ Week is an annual week long celebration of new writing in the UK. The week is overseen by the British Writers’ Council, a body of industry professionals who have led the way in the UK in terms of new writing training. The week’s aims are to provide access to and showcase the best new ideas going on in terms of new writing in the UK. All of this takes place NEXT WEEK – kicking off on Monday 4 July!

As we (excitedly!) announced a little while back, we’re partners of London Writers’ Week and we’ll  be running the Dark Horse Festival as part of it (book here if you want to see the best unproduced plays in London, written by this brilliant bunch of playwrights!)

Dark Horse - The Writers-2

Writers (as pictured): Sonali Bhattacharyya, Eva Edo, Sophia Chapadjiev, John Murray, Ash Sohoye

But that’s not all! We also wanted to let you know about the jam-packed programme of  events for writers taking place throughout the week – with a whole host of free stuff going on! You can find all the details and booking information on the London Writers’ Week website. We’ll also be keeping you up to date as much as possible on Twitter @LDNPlaywrights and on our website.

What’s so great about it? From showcases of the very best in new writing (did we mention Dark Horse?!) including work from the MA in Dramatic Writing at the Drama Centre,  to talks from the Bush Theatre, Oberon Books, Tamasha and the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain, to name but a few. The week is crammed full of interesting events and we think it’ll be a wonderful opportunity to meet some new people, get some inspiration and engage in some stimulating discussions about writing.

See the full programme below! Get booking and we hope to see you there!

MA Dramatic Writing Showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Monday 4 July from 2-4pm

Event with designer Jenny Beavan (London Writers’ Week) – Monday 4 July from 7-9pm

Bush Theatre Workshop: Diversity – how we can create a more diverse theatre industry? (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 11am-12pm

Oberon Books Workshop: Theatre publishing – how does it work? (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 12-1pm

The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting afternoon showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 4-5pm

The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting evening showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 7.30-8.30pm

The National Student Writing Award Launch (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 11am-12pm

The bit that isn’t the songs: book writing for musical theatre with WGGB (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 2-3pm

WGGB event on the aesthetics and ethics of fact-based theatre (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 4-5.30pm

University Women in the Arts announces first public event & partnership with Oberon (London Writers’ Week) – 7 July 2016 at 4pm

Industry showing of Dark Horse Festival (London Writers’ Week) – Thursday 7 July at 4pm

Dark Horse Festival – Public Performance (London Writers’ Week)  – Thursday 7 July at 7.30pm

New Writing Platform with Tim Crouch (London Writers’ Week) – Thursday 7 July from 7-8.30pm

Arts Council session on Grants for the Arts and funding priorities for theatre (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 11am-12pm

BBC Writersroom event on making the transition to writing for radio and screen (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 2-3pm

Tamasha “New Families” Scratch Night (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 7.30-9pm

NAWE Workshop with ‘Myths of the Near Future’ Journal (London Writers’ Week) – Saturday 9 July from 10am-12pm

Read the full details here.

 

Paines Plough – accepting ongoing submissions

Paines Plough have an open submissions policy, here are all the details:

 Not only do we accept unsolicited scripts, we love receiving them. We read every play we’re sent and consider it for production.

If you think we’ll like your play, upload it using the form on our website. Then within ten weeks we’ll let you know whether we want to produce it or not.

Please note that when George and James are in production it can take a little longer for us to get back to you. We can only accept scripts by form so please don’t send us hard copies – we’re trying to save trees.

We do workshops all over the country too, so let us know where you’re based and we’ll get in touch when we’re local.

Here’s a link to the page on the site 

Deadline: none

Source: direct contact.

Pursued By A Bear: “How do I tell actors I’m recasting the roles they developed?”

Pursued By A Bear is our weekly advice column with playwright Adam Taylor.  He’ll tackle your playwriting questions – from practical issues to existential dilemmas – relying on nothing but his bare wits, brute strength, and questionable personal experiences.

“My questions are: what kind of involvement in casting is appropriate from a playwright, and how much input should a playwright expect over casting, especially when working with major theatres? And how do I gently tell actors that I’m taking a play they’ve helped create on without them, or that I’m going to re-cast their roles, especially if they’re the only role being re-cast?

I’d prefer to be anonymous, if that’s okay.”

As a playwright it’s normal to feel some sense of loyalty to the actors and directors you’ve worked with. We often cross paths with fantastic people who put in maximum effort learning lines and attending rehearsals for little more than their expenses and a bottle of wine. This is the reality of working in theatre for many people as they first start out, and it’s difficult not to like people who work their arses off to make your play great.

When you start to get a bit of success the situation inevitably changes; you’re presented with more opportunities and (if you’re any kind of decent human being) you feel the urge to help those who helped you on the way there.

If you’ve had a play on at a fringe venue, or even just a reading, which has taken off and propelled you to that coveted next level, are you obliged to bring along the actors and director who made that success happen?

A lot of us feel we should at least try. These people have worked very hard for us with little reward. Their skills are part of the package we presented to the theatre that picked up the play. And often, in our minds, they have become the physical representation of the characters we dreamt up (even if we originally imagined them very differently). Although I read a couple of Lee Child’s Jack Reacher novels and had the image of the title character as a towering giant in my head, after seeing the film I now can’t imagine anyone other than Tom Cruise in the role (even though he’s clearly nothing like the physical description of Reacher in the novels).

Because of the highly collaborative nature of working in theatre, plays have a tendency to develop into mini communities. Bonds have been formed over your script and it’s very difficult to divorce the people from the words.

As usual reality has other ideas.

The larger theatre that has picked up the play likely has their own director they want to use. This director has a relationship with someone at this theatre, probably in a similar way you have a relationship with your actors. It’s easy to resent the fact you don’t get to choose your own director, but again, bonds have been formed.

This director who works with this theatre also has his/her own group of actors. They’ve worked together on previous plays or they trained together or whatever.

The first important thing you have to understand working in a collaborative industry like theatre is that everyone has people they want to bring up with them.  We all have people we’ve loved working with, people whose talent we greatly admire or people we owe a debt to for one reason or another.

Essentially, it’s natural for us to want to help our friends.

From this point on I guess (cynically speaking) it becomes a bit of a power struggle. Whoever has more control over the production ultimately gets to pick. The person in control tends to be the person with the more established career. If you’re a playwright who’s just starting out you will most likely lose this battle (if you choose to fight it) with a seasoned director who maybe has a long-standing relationship with the theatre or company.

Again, that director has hopefully worked very hard to get to that position and perhaps earned that privilege. You may not feel that way, and it’s certainly not always the case, but I try to be objective about these things. Later in your career, you may well find the ball’s in your court and you get to pick and choose whichever actors you want for your plays, overruling the choices of your up-and-coming director.

That doesn’t mean to say you should.

Actors you’ve worked with may be incredibly talented, awesome and lovely people but that doesn’t mean they’re the right actor for every role in every production. And remember, just because you don’t know the actors your director wants to cast doesn’t mean they’re not every bit as brilliant as your chums.

Don’t be like Tim Burton and try to cast Johnny Depp in everything you make. Maybe the two of you are bestest buds in the whole wide world, but for everyone else that shit wears itself out.

Of course, I will say if you absolutely, positively feel your mate Tristan is just perfect for a certain role in your new play you should try to make that happen. Unfortunately sometimes all you can do is get Tristan an audition, but if you’re right and he truly is the physical and spiritual embodiment of the character, your director will hopefully see that.

Now comes the awkward part.

If you’re unable to have any say whatsoever in the casting process, how do you let your actors and director down gently?

It feels like an awful thing to have to do. However, most actors will recognise it’s beyond your control. A lot of them will understand how these things work already, and if they don’t it’s a lesson they’ll have to learn at some point. The fact you’ve got this playing on your mind tells me you’re trying hard not to be a dick about it. At this moment in time a polite heads-up is technically all you owe them.

They’ve enjoyed working on your play, it’s given them a bit of exposure and they’ve made some new contacts.

It won’t feel pleasant for you or them, but if they’re really good people they’ll be happy for you. And beyond that they’ll understand (or come to learn) it’s not always possible to cast ideally for unpaid readings and development work. It’s very common to settle for someone, however talented they might be, who just isn’t right for the role. In these cases it’s only natural to recast when a professional production opportunity comes along.

Hold your horses though, although it may feel like it at this particular minute, all is not lost. I’m sure you don’t intend to stop writing plays after this run of early success. As I mentioned above there may come a day you have more influence over the casting process. In anticipation of that hallowed time you need to keep in contact with any actors and directors you feel are great at what they do.

Build yourself a network. Invite your people to things you do. Involve them in rehearsed readings of your new work. Meet up with them for a drink or cup of tea or whatever you want to do every so often. Befriend them on the social media and follow their antics. Go and see other readings or plays they’re involved in and hang around after for a catch-up. Recommend them to your other writer friends when they’re looking for actors.

It’s always worth keeping in touch with talented people. You might be able to give them a role in future. They might recommend you for something you otherwise would never have known about. If you ever do end up going down the self-production route you will need a pool of actors to cast from and an extremely reliable director whose judgement you trust implicitly.

The best thing about keeping a good network is that you’ll all be more invested in each other’s work. When you do end up working professionally together you’ll have a great relationship which will inevitably carry over into the rehearsal room. You’ll know each other’s strengths and weaknesses, you’ll be able to create something far stronger together.

The industry as a whole isn’t loyal, but you can be.

Have a question or problem you’d like to send in?  Email advice@londonplaywrightsblog.com and keep your eyes peeled to see if the answer turns up on our site!

(DISCLAIMER: If you send us a question, you’re giving us permission to publish it!  Be sure to indicate what name you’d like us to use as a sign-off when we publish your column, and a just a heads up that we reserve the right to edit submissions for length if needed.)

Photo credit: Tambako the Jaguar via CC license

The Roald Dahl Museum looking for a freelance poet

“The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre is looking for  a Freelance Poet to deliver an activity as part of our Roald Dahl Day on 17th September 2016.  This is an exciting opportunity to take part in one of our biggest events of the year, which will be even bigger this year as we celebrate 100 years since Roald Dahl’s birth.”

The poet will need to plan, resource and deliver an activity that will work with the public to develop a poem during the course of Roald Dahl Day to celebrate the writer and his work.  We are open to the methods that are used to engage visitors and we expect the final form and content to be decided as part of the collaboration on the day.

“It is important to us that the poem is collaborative, able to be completed on Roald Dahl Day and that a range of visitors are able to participate in a meaningful and exciting way”

Please contact Natalie Wallace, Learning Manager, on natalie@roalddahlmuseum.org for a full brief and details of how to apply.

Deadline: 11 July 2016

Paid

Source: Arts Jobs

University Women in the Arts announces first public event & partnership with Oberon

UNIVERSITY WOMEN IN THE ARTS ANNOUNCES FIRST PUBLIC EVENT AND NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH OBERON BOOKS

University Women in the Arts, the new scheme for female students studying arts subjects at Universities across the UK, has announced its first public event.

This will be an In Conversation event with Kate Rowland, founder of BBC Writersroom, the BBC’s new writing department, and the former Creative Director of New Writing at the BBC.

Kate Rowland, will be In Conversation with Jennifer Tuckett, Director of University Women in the Arts and Course Leader of the new MA Dramatic Writing at Drama Centre London at Central Saint Matins.

The free event is open to all and will take place on July 7th at 4pm at Central Saint Martins as part of this year’s London Writers’ Week.

Other mentors who are a part of University Women in the Arts, which brings together and provides access to the advice of 15 of the women who have led the way in the arts in the UK, include Vicky Featherstone, Artistic Director of the Royal Court Theatre, Tamara Rojo, Artistic Director of the English National Ballet, Joanna Prior, Managing Director of Penguin Books, film producer (including of the Harry Potter films) Tanya Seghatchian, Charlotte Higgins, chief culture writer at The Guardian, and historian, columnist and presenter Amanada Foreman, who recently presented the BBC series The Ascent of Women.

The one off scheme aims to address the fact that more women study arts subjects at University level but less women work in the arts, particularly in artistic and leadership roles, for example over 70% of students at the University of the Arts London, Europe’s largest arts University, are female but only around 30% of professional writers and artists are female according to recent Tonic Theatre, British Theatre Consortium and UAL figures.

University Women in the Arts has also announced a new partnership with Oberon Books, who will publish “Women in the Arts”, a new book with interviews with each of the 15 mentors as a permanent legacy for the project, and who join other partners the Women of the Future Programme, Tonic Theatre, Writers at Work Productions and the MA Dramatic Writing at Drama Centre London at Central Saint Martins on supporting the scheme.

Jennifer Tuckett, Director of University Women in the Arts, said: “University Women in the Arts brings together 15 of the women who have led the way in the arts in the UK. We are looking forward to providing access to these women via these 15 free public sessions, where the mentors will discuss their careers, the challenges they have faced and how they have overcome them and offer advice to any women wanting to work in the arts. We also delighted with our new partnership with Oberon Books – the book “Women in the Arts” will provide an important legacy meaning that, even if you can’t attend the public events, you can access the advice of 15 women who are leading the way in the arts in the UK for the first time”.

In addition to the free public sessions, which are open to all, University Women in the Arts has also selected 15 female talented University students form a nationwide search who will receive private advice and mentoring from the 15 mentors over the course of the next year as well.

For more information on University Women in the Arts please go to: www.universitywomeninthearts.com

To book free tickets to the first University Women in the Arts event please go to: www.londonwritersweek-universitywomeninthearts.eventbrite.co.uk

Date of event: 7 July 2016 at 4pm

Source: direct contact

Bristol Old Vic seeking new plays (South West writers only)

Bristol Old Vic’s Literary Department is on the hunt for new and previously unproduced plays and musicals from writers living and working in the South West. Submissions are accepted from Wednesday, 1 June until 18 July, 2016.

If your work is one of the top 5 scripts they receive you’ll be on for a year of Script Development, Masterclasses, Workshops and more! Writers of the top 20 scripts receive a Reader Report on the work submitted, including script editing pointers, and sometimes suggestions about the potential audience for the piece if it’s not right for Bristol Old Vic.

Writers’ work should be submitted by email and will be judged with the entrant’s identity anonymized. For more info, including details of the eligible South West catchment area, and how to submit work, check out the Bristol Old Vic’s website.

Deadline: 18 July 2016

Source: BBC Writersroom

Etch seeking work in development for scratch night

Submissions are now OPEN for etch010 scratch night on Monday 25th July at The Peckham Pelican.

What Etch are looking for:

Either of the following:

  • An extract of new work still in development no more than 15 minutes in length that has never before been produced.
  • A clear outline for an extract of new work to be devised during the 2 day period.

What Etch will be offering:

  • 2 days development and rehearsal of your work in progress.
  • Rehearsal space.
  • A carefully matched director to lead the development and rehearsal.
  • Casting by Etch team.
  • A work in progress performance at The Peckham Pelican performed off-book.
  • Support from the Etch team including sound and stage management.

How to apply: Please send your extracts of new work still in development tosubmissions@etchtheatre.com by Friday 1st July midnight.

They will be accepting submissions from both individuals and companies. If your work already has a director or cast attached, please state this in your email.

This is an unpaid opportunity, all ‘Pay what you can’ proceeds will go directly back into the running of the event

Deadline: 1 July 2016

Source: direct contact

Opportunities Weekly Round-up: 24 June 2016

Our weekly Friday round-up of opportunities listed on the blog that haven’t yet reached their closing date (listed in order of closing date).  Opportunities are grouped into four sections: 1) Pick of the Week & featured posts; 2) Opportunities with Deadlines; 3) Workshops and Events; 4) Ongoing opportunities (No deadline).

Want to be sure you never miss an opportunity?  Sign up for our email list to get the weekly roundup direct to your inbox!

Our latest opportunities Pick of the Week: Free Rayne Artists seeking submissions for Spiral at the Bread & Roses Theatre

This Week in our Advice Column, Pursued By A Bear: Pursued By A Bear: “My political play feels like talking heads”

Coming up with London Playwrights’ Workshop: 

The Dark Horse Festival at London Writers Week

London Writers Week – now booking!

Opportunities with deadlines:

Play Submissions Helper – 51 playwriting competitions with June deadlines

The Dangerous Women Project accepting submissions – Deadline: 24 June 2016

Writer in Residence required for Lit Up! Festival (Poole) – Deadline: 24 June 2016

Fevered Sleep seeking Research Assistant – Deadline: 24 June 2016

Talawa seeking theatremakers aged 16-25 for YPTP:16 – Deadline: 24 June 2016

Drift Theatre accepting submissions for Drift Shop scratch night – Deadline: 26 June 2016

British Urban Film Festival 2016 open to submissions of films and scripts (submission fee) – Early Bird Deadline 27 May 2016; Late Deadline: Monday 27 June 2016

Eastside Screenwriters free Screenwriting Course for 16-19 year olds – Deadline: 27 June 2016

New Writing North seeking Young People’s Programme Manager – Deadline: 29 June 2016 at 5pm

New Works of Merit 2016 Playwriting Contest ($25 entry fee) – Deadline: 30 June 2016

Emerald Theatre seeking short plays for ‘Out of the Closet’ (Tennessee, $10 entry fee) – Deadline: 30 June 2016

Cue Productions seeking small cast plays for workshop & production –  Deadline: 30 June 2016

Black Theatre Live accepting submissions for mid-scale tour – Deadline: 1 July 2016

Tetrad: The Drawing Board – Open Call for Proposals- Deadline: 1 July 2016

Le Théâtre Bleu seeking submissions of comedies in Shakespearean language (Quebec, Canada) – Deadline: 1 July 2016

Imagine Festival of the Arts in Sutton offering grants for projects inspired by HG Wells – Deadline: 4 July 2016

The Owl and Cat Theatre seeking new plays– Deadline: 4 July 2016

Second Sons Theatre Company seeking short alternative comedy plays – Deadline: 4 July 2016

Skint Theatre seeking 10-15 minute plays for Bristol performance– Deadline: 6 July 2016

The Marlowe Theatre Canterbury seeking Literary Associate – Deadline: 8 July 2016

The Eddy (online theatre subscription service) open to play submissions – Deadline: 18 July 2016

Juno Theatre seeking female writer/director to lead comedy workshop -Deadline: none posted but workshop takes place on 23 July 2016

Alfred Fagon Award 2016 open for applications from playwrights of Caribbean or African descent – Deadline: 29 July 2016

BBC Wales Drama Award launched (Welsh writers) – Deadline: 29 July at 5pm (submissions open on 18 July 2016)

2016 Sir Peter Ustinov Television Scriptwriting Award – Deadline: 31 July 2016

The Adrian Pagan Award 2016 launched– Deadline: 31 July 2016

Shonibare Studio open to proposals from guest artists for 2017 – Deadline: 31 July 2016

The John Brabourne Awards open for applications – Deadline: 31 July 2016

Free Rayne Artists seeking submissions for Spiral at the Bread & Roses Theatre – Deadline: 14 August 2016

2016 Terence Rattigan Society Award (£10 entry fee, £2,500 prize) – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Sultan Padamsee Award for Playwriting 2016 – Deadline: 31 August 2016

Ignition Playwriting Competition from Ignite Theatre (£100 prize) -Deadline: 1 September 2016

StageWrite 2017 playwriting competition (open to Bedfordshire students only)- Deadline: 30 September 2016

Bush Theatre opens script window to accept new plays – Deadline: 30 September 2016

Writers required for La Musa Sulla Nuvola – The Muse on the Cloud – Deadline: 20 December 2016

365 Women A Year Playwriting Project open to submissions throughout 2016 – Deadline: 31 December 2016

Events and workshops: 

Masterclass: Introduction to Playwriting with Fin Kennedy (£50) – Saturday 4 June 2016 from 10 – 6pm

Playwriting – All Levels: writing course with Jennifer Farmer at Bishopsgate Institute – 6 June – 11 July 2016

Omnibus Writers Group (£120 for 8 sessions) – Starts 7 June 2016

Talawa Firsts (events with BBC Writersroom) – Starts 16 June 2016

Arvon Course – Playwriting: Improving your playwriting craft from blank page to stage – – 

London Contemporary Play reading workshops  for actors and writers – starts 9 June, 2016, ongoing

‘Tonic Celebrates’ event recognizing women in theatre – 22 June at 7pm

Scripts: An Actor’s Approach – A Workshop with Julie Glover – Saturday 29 June 2016 from 10am – 4pm

Event: How can the industry and academia work together to explore new ideas in dramatic writing? (London Writers’ Week) – Monday 4 July from 10am-1pm

MA Dramatic Writing Showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Monday 4 July from 2-4pm

Event with designer Jenny Beavan (London Writers’ Week) – Monday 4 July from 7-9pm

BBC Writersroom announce the 2016 Salford Sitcom Showcase – 5&6 July 2016

Bush Theatre Workshop: Diversity – how we can create a more diverse theatre industry? (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 11am-12pm

Oberon Books Workshop: Theatre publishing – how does it work? (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 12-1pm

The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting afternoon showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 4-5pm

The Student Guide to Writing: Playwriting evening showcase (London Writers’ Week) – Tuesday 5 July from 7.30-8.30pm

The National Student Writing Award Launch (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 11am-12pm

The bit that isn’t the songs: book writing for musical theatre with WGGB (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 2-3pm

WGGB event on the aesthetics and ethics of fact-based theatre (London Writers’ Week) – Wednesday 6 July from 4-5.30pm

Industry showing of Dark Horse Festival (London Writers’ Week) – Thursday 7 July at 4pm

Dark Horse Festival – Public Performance (London Writers’ Week)  – Thursday 7 July at 7.30pm

New Writing Platform with Tim Crouch (London Writers’ Week) – Thursday 7 July from 7-8.30pm

Arts Council session on Grants for the Arts and funding priorities for theatre (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 11am-12pm

BBC Writersroom event on making the transition to writing for radio and screen (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 2-3pm

Tamasha “New Families” Scratch Night (London Writers’ Week) – Friday 8 July from 7.30-9pm

NAWE Workshop with ‘Myths of the Near Future’ Journal (London Writers’ Week) – Saturday 9 July from 10am-12pm

Writers’ Mutual Retreat in Bordeaux (£350-£450) – 12th-18th July

Arvon Course – Writing For Puppetry: Writing The Impossible – – 

Arvon Course – Musical Theatre: Using music and lyrics to tell the tale – – 

Ongoing submissions:

BBC Comedy Classroom – Comedy writing resources for young people – various deadlines

JW3 seeking submissions of pieces about Jewish culture – rolling

BFI Postroom open to submissions of films and scripts from emerging filmmakers – rolling

Jo Smith Productions open for submissions – rolling

Writers’ Mutual writing group – Wednesdays 11am-1pm

Opportunities to hear your play with Player Playwrights – Ongoing submissions

Online Playwriting Course with Live Theatre (£95-£495) – rolling

Playwrights Circle at the Bread & Roses – Ongoing (monthly event)

The Institute of Other seeking creative practitioners – Deadline: none posted

White Hart Trust Studios seeking international and foreign language theatre – Deadline: none posted

Pokfulam Rd Productions looking for playwrights and creatives – Deadline: none posted

55 Kings Contemporary Theatre Productions looking for writers – Deadline: none posted

Plane Paper Theatre call out for plays – Deadline: none posted

Theatrelab seeking scripts to perform at ‘WordPlay’ at Bath Spa University – Deadline: none posted

Londonville Lit offering reading slots – Deadline: none posted

Madam Renards Mini Fringe Festival Swindon open for applications from writers and performers – Deadline: none posted (festival takes place in 2016)

Orange Tea Theatre accepting submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Funding available for students at Glasgow University MLitt Playwriting & Dramaturgy – Deadline: None posted

Everything Theatre accepting plays for podcast readings – Deadline: None posted

The Cockpit Theatre seeking work for scratch nights – No deadline posted but performances take place on the first Monday of the month.

Shred Productions open to submissions – Deadline: None (open submissions)

Poppy Seed – accepting submissions of 5 minute scripts for blog – Deadline: None posted

COG ARTSpace call out for playwrights! – Deadline: None

Dark Horse Festival tickets – booking open!

London Writers’ Week is right around the corner, so be sure to get your tickets if you want to get a taste of the most exciting new writing in London!

Featuring new work by Sonali Bhattacharyya, Sophia Chapadjiev, Eva Edo, John Murray, and Ash Sohoye.

When: Thursday 7 July 2016 at 7.30pm*

Where: Platform Theatre, Central Saint Martins, Handyside Street, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA

Price:  £5 (plus booking fee) – all proceeds go towards the creatives involved with the event

How to book:  Click the link to visit the eventbrite page

Curious to know more about the writers?  Click through to read about this fantastic group. And watch this space for more details about the plays, directors, and casting…

(*Please note there is also an industry showing at 4pm, which can be booked by contacting darkhorsescripts@gmail.com.)

Want to support the Dark Horse Festival & our initiatives for writers? Please visit our GoFundMe page!

Many thanks to Arts Council England (www.artscouncil.org.uk) and the MA Dramatic Writing at Drama Centre  London for their support.

lottery_Logo_Black RGBLondon Writers Week logo 2016