What to do when you win: Sarah Hamilton shares her experience of putting on her first full-length production

So you’ve won your first playwriting competition. Brilliant. Now what? In this guest post, new writer Sarah Tejal Hamilton shares her experience of winning her first short play competition and the challenge of putting on a full-length work.

Last October I won London Horror Festival’s playwriting competition, a 10-minute piece called Chew, which was judged with two other finalists at a live performance at the Etcetera Theatre in Camden.

It was an accident. No, really. I like writing all sorts of topics and genres and happened to enter this contest – my first horror play – in a frenzied year where I had recently left a full-time role as a journalist to focus on developing my playwriting.

As many of you reading this will attest, it feels like you spend all your time writing, getting rejected or ‘send us your next one’ emails – so when you finally achieve (a small) success, you’re not quite sure how to handle it.

But winning was just the start – the prize was an hour-long slot at the Etcetera’s BlackBox Festival over a three-night run. Say what? Three nights? That’s what proper real writers do.  Crumbs.

My first piece of advice to anyone lucky enough to find out they’ve won something is don’t panic. It sounds simple but it’s easy to forget. You’ll be fine. You’ll get it done. You’ve written something good that’s going to get performed. Quit mithering.

In my case, the theatre was only providing the basic space and some publicity, so tech, actors, director, producer and marketing were all in my hands, right down to deciding the dates and prices. What do I know?!

As time was tight, I wanted to make sure I had the basic scaffolding in place – the director, producer, tech – so I could be left alone to worry about the writing of the new piece and not stress about how it was going to get delivered. I decided to retain Rory Fairbairn, who had been the director of my 10-minute piece, (who incidentally I only met on the day of the live final), because he did a good job and I trusted his casting. Luckily, he was available and happy to direct.

Now, producers. Do you need one? I would say it’s useful to have someone who can deal with the technical issues and logistics, and sometimes that will be the director. In this case, Rory had recently started his own theatre company, Red Squash, and was happy to take these duties on board, at their expense. This also included casting the piece. But our first step was to draft an agreement stating what his theatre company would and wouldn’t do. This was in the form of an email, but you could also choose to draw up a basic contract if the length and budget of your show are larger.

Speaking of which, we had zero budget – so keeping costs low was key. When tackling publicity, we decided flyers weren’t worth it in the age of Twitter and Facebook, but a few posters were made to put in the venue. Red Squash also had a designer who created a publicity image after I gave Rory an idea of the kind of thing I was looking for. We also had very basic A5 programmes for the audience on the night giving a brief bio on the writer, cast, director etc. Photography is also nice for posterity as well as CVs so try and get someone who’s good with a camera to take some pictures during rehearsals – also great for publicity in the run-up.

I have a journalism background, so crafting a press release and sending it out to relevant media was straightforward – when doing this, don’t forget fan sites for your genre of play: they can be a great place to find an audience who are already into what you’re trying to do. Inviting agents and theatre literary departments is also a good idea – they may not all come, but you’ve waved a little flag about yourself and many do ask to be kept in touch about future work so remember to do so.

The theatre’s deal with me was a profit share, (in the theatre’s favour of course), so for simplicity I decided to split my chunk equally with the director and cast.

That left decisions on ticket pricing, performance dates and times. I tried to get as much advice as I could from the theatre, more experienced playwrights, and my own research. But guess what? There isn’t one golden answer. So we chose the final dates of the festival (closing it in style and giving us maximum rehearsal time), and priced it at £10 with £8 concessions. This was based on Chew being a full production borne of an award-winning show. The pricing also gave some leeway incase we needed to offer discounts.

In reality, for this sort of production, your audience will be mainly made up of family and friends so you don’t want them to be paying wild amounts. Plus, extra comp tickets above your free allocation will be charged back to you, albeit at a reduced rate, so consider what you can afford if you end up paying for all your industry contacts to get in free.

You will probably be made to sign a contract with the theatre.  I think it is worth getting an experienced third party to advise you on it, especially if you don’t have the luxury of an agent. In my case, it made more sense for Red Squash to have that relationship with the theatre as I had no involvement in production, tech or casting.

So, with all the business end and director/producer sorted, I could focus on reworking my play, agreeing draft deadlines, and enjoying the Christmas break, which came in the middle.

I was also really keen on having a read-through of a pre-final draft with the cast before I submitted the finished piece. This was really useful, not least to catch up with the actors – who the director also retained from the original production – get feedback on where I was heading with my new play and ensure I was in the loop. I made sure I was as happy as I could be with this draft, because I anticipated I wouldn’t get a chance for rewrites, or be involved in the rehearsal process.

If anything, the experience has taught me what kind of people I want to work with in the future, a small insight into the business of putting on a theatre event and the confidence to maybe give directing and producing a go. Which means, however this weekend has gone, I’ll be the richer for it.

I’d love to see you at Chew – please let me know what you think! For more, please visit: http://www.etceteratheatre.com/details.php?show_id=2217

Tips:

  • Fight to be heard. Make sure lines of communication are open with your team. Putting on a play is a collaborative process – and that includes the writer! Not all directors like this but don’t ever let baby be put in the corner. The flipside is, of course, be patient, listen well, and choose your battles.
  • Want to be reviewed? Make sure you do your research on what their deadlines are. Review sites and theatre bloggers will be getting lots of requests so if they advise three weeks’ notice, make sure it’s factored into your planning.
  • Media coverage important to you? Take time to find the right journalist by name and personalise the email. I’ve been sent press releases that have said ‘Dear [Enter name here]…’ Not a good look.
  • Want to give something back? Why not get aspiring writers, upcoming technical creatives, even wannabe directors to shadow the production process to give them experience in a real production? They’ll probably also have some really fresh ideas.
  • Don’t forget to say thank-you. To the theatre, audience, industry contacts who take time to come – and pay for their own tickets if they do, actors and director. And follow up with them afterwards.
  • Remember how brilliant this opportunity is. Good or bad reviews, small or large audience, it’s an amazing first step, a unique experience, so remember to enjoy it. Worse things happen at sea.

Sarah Tejal Hamilton decided to focus on her drama writing last year following the closure of her newspaper over Christmas 2014. She had been a full-time local and national journalist for 14 years working on titles including the Reading Post, where she was news editor, as well as freelancing for nationals including The Sunday Times, Sun and Independent on Sunday. She now combines her playwriting with being a freelance journalist and copywriter. Sarah has previously taken part in the Royal Court Theatre’s writers’ programmes. Last year she also co-mentored former Armed Forces personnel in writing for the stage.
She can be contacted @thereadingscoop.

Photo credit:  Robbie Ewing

Opportunities Weekly Round-up: 29 January 2016

Our weekly Friday round-up of opportunities listed on the blog that haven’t yet reached their closing date (listed in order of closing date).  Opportunities are grouped into four sections: 1) Pick of the Week & featured posts; 2) Opportunities with Deadlines; 3) Workshops and Events; 4) Ongoing opportunities (no deadline).

Want to be sure you never miss an opportunity?  Sign up for our email list to get the weekly roundup direct to your inbox!

Our latest opportunities Pick of the Week: HighTide accepting scripts for First Commissions attachment scheme

This week in our advice column: Pursued By A Bear: “Settle our bet: which is more important, reading or watching plays?”

Coming up with London Playwrights’ Workshop: 

Re-drafting Your Play – with Kimberley Andrews

Spring Workshops with London Playwrights’ Blog

Opportunities with deadlines:

Bread & Roses seeking shows for May 2016 – Deadline: none posted, but time is of the essence!

25 January 2016

 Brockley Jack accepting submissions for Write Now 7 – Deadline: 29 January 2016

29 Plays Later returns: a playwriting challenge for February 2016 – Deadline: 29 January 2016

Drip Action Theatre Company seeking submissions for 2016 Arundel Festival Theatre Trail (paid) – Deadline: 31 January 2016

‘Writing Places’ Writer in Residence at Greenway – Deadline: 31 January 2016

Book Music & Lyrics accepting applications for First Year Workshops for Librettists and Lyricists – Deadline: 31 January 2016

Talawa currently open to script submissions from Black writers – Deadline: 31 January 2016

“Scratch it!” with Tigz Theatre seeking 20 minute scratch performances on LGBT Themes – Deadline: 31 January 2016

Brave New World seeking new writing – Deadline: 1 February 2016 at 9am

Create Scratch Refine Repeat at Morley College seeking new work – Deadline: 5 February 2016

2016 Saroyan/Paul Human Rights Playwriting Prize ($10,000 prize, $20 entry fee) – Deadline: 1 February 2016 7 February 2016

Soggy Brass @ Southwark Playhouse open for submissions (paid) – Deadline: 7 February 2016

Sheer Height Theatre seeking submissions for Women Redressed – Deadline: 5 February 2016 8 February 2016

Call for submissions for radical ideas at Rich Mix – Deadline: 10 February 2016

50/50 Gender Equality scratch night accepting submissions – Deadline: 12 February 2016 at 5pm

James Tait Black Prize for Drama 2016 open to submissions from theatres and agents (£10,000 prize) – Deadline: 12 February 2016

HighTide accepting submissions for First Commissions attachment scheme – Deadline: 14 February 2016 at 6pm

HighTide accepting submissions of plays for 4 weeks only- Deadline: 14 February 2016 at 6pm (Note: this is a separate opportunity from the one listed above)

Stitchin’ Fiction – call for submissions for rehearsed readings – Deadline 14 February 2016 at midnight

Lyric Hammersmith Young Harts Festival accepting submissions (10-25 year olds) – Deadline: 19 February 2016

Etch Theatre seeking submissions for a Festival of New Writing – Deadline: 14 February 2016

The Owl and Cat Theatre seeking submissions – Deadline: 22 February 2016 at 5pm

First Break Writing Competition at the Oldham Coliseum – Deadline: 22 February 2016

Octagon Prize for Dramatic Monologues – Deadline: 26 February 2016

Nickelodeon Writing Program – Open for Submissions – Deadline: 28 February 2016

Drift Shop accepting submissions of short pieces of writing for scratch night – Deadline: 28 February 2016

Theatre503 Playwriting Award returning in 2016 –  Deadline: 29 February 2016

Rebel Without Crew Films seeking shorts for production (female writers only) – Deadline: 29 February 2016

New Competition Launched with Drama Centre London, Bush Theatre, Oberon Books and Partners – Deadline: 1 March 2016 (entries open 15 February 2016)

Sky or the Bird seeking writers for The Adults Adventure Playground (Calais Benefit) – Deadline: 2 March 2016

Windsor Fringe – Kenneth Branagh Award for New Drama Writing 2016 – Deadline: 5 March 2016

Sky Academy Arts Scholarships – Theatre & Comedy (18-30 year olds) – Deadline: 10 March 2016

Sedos seeking 10 minute scripts for production in London & Edinburgh (£5 entry fee) – Deadline: 11 March 2016

About Love’ Festival of short plays call for submissions (Canada $10 entry fee/ $150 prize – Deadline: 20 March 2016

Blue Skies Workshops for writers from Sky or the Bird – Deadline: 31 March 2016

The Production Exchange seeking play submissions for development – Deadline: 31 March 2016

2016 Papatango Prize Opens – with extra £6000 award! – Deadline: 31 March 2016

University of Wolverhampton accepting proposals for POP Drama – Deadline: 31 March 2016

Nick Darke Writers’ Award 2016 open for entries – Deadline: 30 May 2016

ShowBiz Shorts Playwriting Contest (Los Angeles) – Deadline: 30 May 2016

365 Women A Year Playwriting Project open to submissions throughout 2016 – Deadline: 31 December 2016

Events and workshops: 

Morning writing workshops with Write & Shine – 14 January, 21 January, & 28 January (separate events)

Workshops with ‘Tiny Women Brains’ Comedy Festival – 29-31 January 2016

Playwriting Workshop with Jennifer Farmer at the Bishopsgate Institute (Classes take place on Mondays 6.30pm – 8.30pm, 1 February – 7 March 2016 & Saturday 27 February, 10.30am – 2.30pm)

‘DAT Day’ meet and greet at the Drayton Arms – 1 February 2016

London Playwrights’ Workshop: Re-drafting your play with Kimberley Andrews – Starts 4 February 2016

Creativity for Scriptwriters – 1 day course with Phil Shelley – 7 February 2016

Free Online Screenwriting Course with University of East Anglia, Creative Skillset and Future Learn – Starts on 29 February 2016

London Playwrights’ Workshop: INTENSIVE WORKSHOP – Finding Inspiration and Developing your Idea – 5 March 2016

National Theatre Course: developing your play with Jemma Kennedy (£450 bursaries available) – Every Wednesday from 16 March until 19 May 2016, 10am – 1pm

London Playwrights’ Workshop: INTENSIVE WORKSHOP – Creating Engaging Characters – 17 March 2016

Ongoing submissions:

Online Playwriting Course with Live Theatre (£95-£495) – rolling

Playwrights Circle at the Bread & Roses – Ongoing (monthly event)

2016 Terence Rattigan Society Award (£2,500 prize) – Deadline TBC

The Institute of Other seeking creative practitioners – Deadline: none posted

White Hart Trust Studios seeking international and foreign language theatre – Deadline: none posted

Pokfulam Rd Productions looking for playwrights and creatives – Deadline: none posted

55 Kings Contemporary Theatre Productions looking for writers – Deadline: none posted

Plane Paper Theatre call out for plays – Deadline: none posted

Theatrelab seeking scripts to perform at ‘WordPlay’ at Bath Spa University – Deadline: none posted

Londonville Lit offering reading slots – Deadline: none posted

Madam Renards Mini Fringe Festival Swindon open for applications from writers and performers – Deadline: none posted (festival takes place in 2016)

East End Literary Salon open to rolling submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Orange Tea Theatre accepting submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Funding available for students at Glasgow University MLitt Playwriting & Dramaturgy – Deadline: None posted

Everything Theatre accepting plays for podcast readings – Deadline: None posted

The Cockpit Theatre seeking work for scratch nights – No deadline posted but performances take place on the first Monday of the month.

Shred Productions open to submissions – Deadline: None (open submissions)

Poppy Seed – accepting submissions of 5 minute scripts for blog – Deadline: None posted

COG ARTSpace call out for playwrights! – Deadline: None

Brave New World seeking new writing

BRAVE NEW WORD IS BACK! There’ll be 10 pieces of UNSEEN, brand new writing, as well as ample mingling opportunities, music and drinks alongside the gorgeous vistas of Regent’s Canal.

“INSTANT MATCH delves into our Swipe Right/Left culture, and the search for connection in an ultra-connected, tech-savvy world. This time, we’re hosting at the Proud Archivist in Haggerston. Tickets cost £5, which also includes a drink (bargain), and allows us to cover the space. There’ll be available on the door”

WRITERS:
They’re looking for 5-minute scratch pieces of new writing//drama//prose//poetry on the theme of ‘love in the age of Tinder’ to be submitted by 9am on the 1st of Feburary and sent as an attachment to bravenewwordfest@gmail.com.

A full list of guidelines is available here:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CZA_wGtWwAAR7er.jpg:large.

Deadline: 1 February 2016 at 9am

Source: Playwriting UK Facebook

Opportunities: Our Pick of the Week – HighTide accepting scripts for First Commissions attachment scheme

Each week we look through our pile of writing opportunities to pick out one we think is particularly worth your time. It could be an innovative brief, great prize money, a high-profile company, or just plain fun.

This week’s pick:  HighTide accepting scripts for First Commissions attachment scheme

DescriptionFirst Commissions is HighTide’s attachment programme for writers. Over the course of 18 months (freelance / part time), five playwrights will be mentored in different aspects of playwriting from making an applications for Arts Council Funding to producing two rehearsed readings in professional theatres. Writers will also engage with an established playwright as a mentor and dramaturg.

So, what’s so great about it? We like the fact that this opportunity provides 18 months of solid practical training, so it really is about long-term career development rather than achieving short term goals. During the attachment, writers will get loads of opportunities to learn the practical skills needed to make playwriting their career – from tackling Arts Council applications to writing a play to organising their own rehearsed readings. At LPB, we’re all about empowering writers to be able make things happen for themselves and it feels like this scheme will equip writers with the skills to do just that. You’ve got until 14 February to get those applications in.

Read the full details here.

Please note, we’ve posted this for your convenience and we’re not affiliated with the organisers of the opportunity in any way.

 

Pursued By A Bear: “Settle our bet: which is more important, reading or watching plays?”

Pursued By A Bear is our weekly advice column with playwright Adam Taylor.  He’ll tackle your playwriting questions – from practical issues to existential dilemmas – relying on nothing but his bare wits, brute strength, and questionable personal experiences.   

“Hello, I’m writing in to ask if you can help settle a debate I’m having with my friend. (We’re both playwrights.)  Is it more important for people trying to become playwrights to read plays to understand how they work on the page, or to watch plays to see how theatre works with an audience?  And yes, I know they’re both important, but if you had to pick one, which do you think is most critical?  I’ve left out my opinion in the interest of objectivity, but so you know, there’s a free drink for the winner riding on your answer.  Cheers!”

I’m flattered you’re looking to me to settle this debate. Knowing there’s a drink riding on my answer I’ve had to give it even more serious thought than I normally would.

I once went to a karaoke bar in Japan and sang The Way You Make Me Feel by Michael Jackson.  During the second verse, instead of:

“I like the feeling you’re giving me, just hold me baby and I’m in ecstasy.”

The words on screen prompted me to sing:

“I like the fee when you’re killing me, I told my baby that I live next to sea.”

Aside from the fact the lyrics were probably transcribed by a Japanese person with questionable English, it struck me that it’s often difficult to understand a word Michael Jackson is singing. He used that short, sharp delivery and his instrumentals are so dense it can sometimes be hard to focus on what he’s saying.

I own all of his albums on CD somewhere and seem to remember that each one had the lyrics printed in the little cover booklet.

If I really wanted to understand the words and the process behind writing the lyrics I might reasonably refer to those booklets rather than listening to the CD.

After all, songs are remade and remixed all the time and only the lyrics remain the same. Doesn’t that mean they’re the most important part?

But if I only had the booklets and not the CDs, would I ever know how incredible the songs are?

No.

Not unless I’m a highly talented musician with the creativity to imagine what the song could sound like, just from looking at the words.

What if my imagination drew up something closer to that horrendous Alien Ant Farm cover than to Jacko’s masterpiece Smooth Criminal? I would justifiably think the song was a horrible piece of crap.

Without the drums, synths, horns, and overall groove, Michael Jackson’s lyrics are just words on a page. I wouldn’t have any idea what the end product sounded like. I don’t think I could even pin down the genre with much accuracy.

I guess the question then is, if I was a songwriter and was looking towards MJ for inspiration, would I need to know what the final songs sounded like or would the words be enough?

In theatre there are so many elements that go into a production aside from the script that it’s sometimes difficult to separate the words from the final production. In order to understand how a piece of theatre works we really need to immerse ourselves in the live aspect of it.

As a writer it’s vital you understand what costume designers, lighting engineers, directors, actors, producers and set designers can add to your piece. Think of how much a playwright leaves unspoken compared to a novelist. All of the blanks in theatre are filled in by other creative minds.

We gain an impression of each character in the play, and we tend to assume it comes from the writer. But how much of that impression is added by the actor’s intonation, voice and appearance? How much of it is added by costume and lighting and the environment in which the character is standing?

It’s impossible to say.

Just as with Michael Jackson and Alien Ant Farm, we can watch two separate productions of the same piece and come away with completely different feelings, even though the words are almost exactly the same.

As playwrights, a full production is what we’re aiming for most of the time, and as we write it’s helpful to know what that end goal looks like.

But I don’t think as members of the audience we can separate the script from the other elements of the performance. And therefore it becomes difficult at times to analyse exactly what a writer is doing.

This is why it can be enormously helpful to read the script. You can understand exactly what the writer is doing; how sentences are put together, how dialogue is paced, how speech patterns are created. You can take your time and break down the structure of the play in a way you don’t have room to do in a live theatre situation.

You can really study that shit.

And when you’re reading a play, hopefully you’re not just reading it. You’re visualising it in your head as well; you’re seeing images of the characters and the locations.

Not everyone can do this to the same extent though; some people have very visual minds while others are more analytical or literal.

So here’s where this answer might begin to seem like a bit of a cop-out, because I’m going to put a big, fat if in here.

If you have a fantastic imagination and can picture all the disparate elements that make up a play in your mind as you’re reading, you can probably get along fine just reading scripts. I’m not saying watching productions isn’t also helpful to visual people like you, but you could probably survive as a writer with just scripts for inspiration.

If you don’t have a very vivid imagination you might well draw more inspiration from watching live productions. That’s not to say you’re any less creative, some people think more conceptually, through ideas and statements rather than images.

In an ideal world you’ll read a play and then go and watch the live production or vice versa. This will give you an idea of what the writer has done and show you one of the infinite possible productions that could come from that script. For obvious reasons this can’t always happen; you can’t always find a script or a production of the play you want at that moment in time.

Sorry if I haven’t really settled your debate. In my mind, you’re both absolutely right.

Because if you feel reading plays is more important than seeing shows, that’s what you need to do.

Conversely, if you feel seeing shows is more important than reading plays, that’s what you need to do.

There are really no right or wrong answers when it comes to creativity. If you can only do one thing, do the thing that feels vital to you. Never let anyone else tell you there’s a right way or a better way.

The right way is the way that inspires you personally and has you doing your best work.

Having said that, in reality there will be situations in which you can do both. Go to the theatre when you can. Read plays when you can. Watch movies, read books, watch TV, read comics, listen to music, watch sports, stare out the window.

Take in anything and everything that inspires you. It can all undoubtedly be useful. But I’d also argue that none of it is essential.

The only essential part is the writing.

My suggestion is for each of you to buy the other a drink. Preferably in a karaoke bar. Wash away this entire debate with wine and song.

Then go home and write.

Have a question or problem you’d like to send in?  Email advice@londonplaywrightsblog.com and keep your eyes peeled to see if the answer turns up on our site!

(DISCLAIMER: If you send us a question, you’re giving us permission to publish it!  Be sure to indicate what name you’d like us to use as a sign-off when we publish your column, and a just a heads up that we reserve the right to edit submissions for length if needed.)

50/50 Gender Equality scratch night accepting submissions

AIAWTC presents…
“50/50” at Arts Above, upstairs at The Arts Theatre in the West End 30th March 2016. The night has been designed so that new and established theatre companies will have the chance
to perform, network, discuss, and most importantly celebrate equality in casting. Bringing together some of the most exciting emerging theatre companies in our egalitarian extravaganza!

They are looking for submissions of short scenes, monologues, and extracts from theatre – new writing
or exciting twists on well loved works.

They will compere the night so that the casts are equally
split men-to-women across the evening. But your scene could be all-male, all-female or something in between!

 What you get: a performance slot on our 50/50 day (matinee + evening performances) of a 5-15 minute scene and they will provide a two hour rehearsal slot in the space ahead of the performance day.

 

TO ENTER:
You’ll need to enter through Hiive. Please answer all the questions outlined in the application form.

Deadline: Friday 12th February at 5pm.

“Shortlisted candidates will be contacted on the 17th with an invitation to meet us w/c 22nd Feb.
At the next round we would like to meet with you to discuss and see a short section of your work.
We will notify the ten successful groups by the 29th Feb, allowing one month then to fully prepare the piece.
Each group will be allotted a two-hour rehearsal slot in the space ahead of the performance day”.

Source: Hiive

 

Create Scratch Refine Repeat at Morley College seeking new work

Are you an emerging theatre company or artist planning to take your new work up to Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2016? If yes, the Morley Scratch Night is for you.

Following the success of their inaugural Create Scratch Refine Repeat competition, Morley College is hosting another scratch night in March 2016 aimed at theatre companies taking new work up to Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Morley College is looking for 4 theatre companies or artists to present 10-15 minutes of scratch work across 2 nights to a live audience and a panel of industry judges.

The panel of judges will provide feedback on development of the work and one company or artist will be selected to perform their full length EDINBURGH PREVIEW show in July at our Studio Theatre space.

4 theatre companies/artist will perform their scratch work across 2 nights in March to a live audience and a panel of industry judges.        

How to apply: using the application form/ Hiive website

Deadline: 5 February 2016

Source: Hiive

The Owl and Cat Theatre seeking submissions

The Owl and Cat are currently accepting script submissions from playwrights to be produced by The Owl and Cat Theatre as part of their second season 2016, Melbourne Australia (www.owlandcat.com.au).

Submission Guidelines:

-MUST be in pdf format ONLY

-Plays should be 50min-70min in length.

-Should explore contemporary themes.

-Should be provocative, thought provoking and confronting in nature.

-Should be professionally formatted

-Musicals are NOT accepted.

One submission per playwright.

-Previously submitted works are NOT accepted.

How to apply: Applications should be emailed to Thomas@owlandcat.com.au with the subject heading ‘Season Submission.’

Deadline: 22 February 2016 at 5pm

*Payment is negotiable.

Source: direct contact

Opportunities Weekly Round-up: 22 January 2016

 

Our weekly Friday round-up of opportunities listed on the blog that haven’t yet reached their closing date (listed in order of closing date).  Opportunities are grouped into four sections: 1) Pick of the Week & featured posts; 2) Opportunities with Deadlines; 3) Workshops and Events; 4) Ongoing opportunities (no deadline).

Want to be sure you never miss an opportunity?  Sign up for our email list to get the weekly roundup direct to your inbox!

Our latest opportunities Pick of the Week: 2016 Papatango Award – with extra £6000 award!

This week in our advice column: I’m dyslexic and no one will take my work seriously

Coming up with London Playwrights’ Workshop: 

Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A day-long introduction

Re-drafting Your Play – with Kimberley Andrews

Spring Workshops with London Playwrights’ Blog

Opportunities with deadlines:

Bread & Roses seeking shows for May 2016 – Deadline: none posted, but time is of the essence!

RSC seeking deputy literary manager (jobs) – Deadline: 22 January 2016

 

 

CCBC Anim8 – Animation Pilot Scheme Open for Submissions – Deadline: 22 January 2016

Red Planet Prize 2016 – Launched! – Deadline: 22 January 2016 (Submissions open on 4 January 2016) –

Development Lab at the Lyric Hammersmith (16-25 year olds) – Deadline: 25 January 2016

Future C U R I O S Film Lab (open to 16 to 24 year olds) – Deadline: 25 January 2016

 Brockley Jack accepting submissions for Write Now 7 – Deadline: 29 January 2016

29 Plays Later returns: a playwriting challenge for February 2016 – Deadline: 29 January 2016

Drip Action Theatre Company seeking submissions for 2016 Arundel Festival Theatre Trail (paid) – Deadline: 31 January 2016

‘Writing Places’ Writer in Residence at Greenway – Deadline: 31 January 2016

Book Music & Lyrics accepting applications for First Year Workshops for Librettists and Lyricists – Deadline: 31 January 2016

Talawa currently open to script submissions from Black writers – Deadline: 31 January 2016

“Scratch it!” with Tigz Theatre seeking 20 minute scratch performances on LGBT Themes – Deadline: 31 January 2016

2016 Saroyan/Paul Human Rights Playwriting Prize ($10,000 prize, $20 entry fee) – Deadline: 1 February 2016

Sheer Height Theatre seeking submissions for Women Redressed – Deadline: 5 February 2016

Soggy Brass @ Southwark Playhouse open for submissions (paid) – Deadline: 7 February 2016

Call for submissions for radical ideas at Rich Mix – Deadline: 10 February 2016

James Tait Black Prize for Drama 2016 open to submissions from theatres and agents (£10,000 prize) – Deadline: 12 February 2016

HighTide accepting submissions for First Commissions attachment scheme – Deadline: 14 February 2016 at 6pm

HighTide accepting submissions of plays for 4 weeks only- Deadline: 14 February 2016 at 6pm (Note: this is a separate opportunity from the one listed above)

Stitchin’ Fiction – call for submissions for rehearsed readings – Deadline 14 February 2016 at midnight

Lyric Hammersmith Young Harts Festival accepting submissions (10-25 year olds) – Deadline: 19 February 2016

Etch Theatre seeking submissions for a Festival of New Writing – Deadline: 14 February 2016

First Break Writing Competition at the Oldham Coliseum – Deadline: 22 February 2016

Octagon Prize for Dramatic Monologues – Deadline: 26 February 2016

Nickelodeon Writing Program – Open for Submissions – Deadline: 28 February 2016

Drift Shop accepting submissions of short pieces of writing for scratch night – Deadline: 28 February 2016

Theatre503 Playwriting Award returning in 2016 –  Deadline: 29 February 2016

Rebel Without Crew Films seeking shorts for production (female writers only) – Deadline: 29 February 2016

New Competition Launched with Drama Centre London, Bush Theatre, Oberon Books and Partners – Deadline: 1 March 2016 (entries open 15 February 2016)

Sky or the Bird seeking writers for The Adults Adventure Playground (Calais Benefit) – Deadline: 2 March 2016

Windsor Fringe – Kenneth Branagh Award for New Drama Writing 2016 – Deadline: 5 March 2016

Sky Academy Arts Scholarships – Theatre & Comedy (18-30 year olds) – Deadline: 10 March 2016

Sedos seeking 10 minute scripts for production in London & Edinburgh (£5 entry fee) – Deadline: 11 March 2016

About Love’ Festival of short plays call for submissions (Canada $10 entry fee/ $150 prize – Deadline: 20 March 2016

Blue Skies Workshops for writers from Sky or the Bird – Deadline: 31 March 2016

The Production Exchange seeking play submissions for development – Deadline: 31 March 2016

2016 Papatango Prize Opens – with extra £6000 award! – Deadline: 31 March 2016

University of Wolverhampton accepting proposals for POP Drama – Deadline: 31 March 2016

Nick Darke Writers’ Award 2016 open for entries – Deadline: 30 May 2016

ShowBiz Shorts Playwriting Contest (Los Angeles) – Deadline: 30 May 2016

365 Women A Year Playwriting Project open to submissions throughout 2016 – Deadline: 31 December 2016

Events and workshops: 

Morning writing workshops with Write & Shine – 14 January, 21 January, & 28 January (separate events)

London Playwrights’ Workshop: Your Self-Producing Toolkit: A day-long introduction – Saturday 23 January 2016 from 10.30am – 5pm

Workshops with ‘Tiny Women Brains’ Comedy Festival – 29-31 January 2016

Playwriting Workshop with Jennifer Farmer at the Bishopsgate Institute (Classes take place on Mondays 6.30pm – 8.30pm, 1 February – 7 March 2016 & Saturday 27 February, 10.30am – 2.30pm)

‘DAT Day’ meet and greet at the Drayton Arms – 1 February 2016

London Playwrights’ Workshop: Re-drafting your play with Kimberley Andrews – Starts 4 February 2016

Free Online Screenwriting Course with University of East Anglia, Creative Skillset and Future Learn – Starts on 29 February 2016

London Playwrights’ Workshop: INTENSIVE WORKSHOP – Finding Inspiration and Developing your Idea – 5 March 2016

National Theatre Course: developing your play with Jemma Kennedy (£450 bursaries available) – Every Wednesday from 16 March until 19 May 2016, 10am – 1pm

London Playwrights’ Workshop: INTENSIVE WORKSHOP – Creating Engaging Characters – 17 March 2016

Ongoing submissions:

Online Playwriting Course with Live Theatre (£95-£495) – rolling

Playwrights Circle at the Bread & Roses – Ongoing (monthly event)

2016 Terence Rattigan Society Award (£2,500 prize) – Deadline TBC

The Institute of Other seeking creative practitioners – Deadline: none posted

White Hart Trust Studios seeking international and foreign language theatre – Deadline: none posted

Pokfulam Rd Productions looking for playwrights and creatives – Deadline: none posted

55 Kings Contemporary Theatre Productions looking for writers – Deadline: none posted

Plane Paper Theatre call out for plays – Deadline: none posted

Theatrelab seeking scripts to perform at ‘WordPlay’ at Bath Spa University – Deadline: none posted

Londonville Lit offering reading slots – Deadline: none posted

Madam Renards Mini Fringe Festival Swindon open for applications from writers and performers – Deadline: none posted (festival takes place in 2016)

East End Literary Salon open to rolling submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Orange Tea Theatre accepting submissions – Deadline: Rolling

Funding available for students at Glasgow University MLitt Playwriting & Dramaturgy – Deadline: None posted

Everything Theatre accepting plays for podcast readings – Deadline: None posted

The Cockpit Theatre seeking work for scratch nights – No deadline posted but performances take place on the first Monday of the month.

Shred Productions open to submissions – Deadline: None (open submissions)

Poppy Seed – accepting submissions of 5 minute scripts for blog – Deadline: None posted

COG ARTSpace call out for playwrights! – Deadline: None posted

Creativity for Scriptwriters – 1 day course with Phil Shelley

CREATIVITY FOR SCRIPTWRITERS 1 day course London Saturday Feb 7th 2016

A course for scriptwriters in all media – TV, film, radio, theatre – designed to help you generate exciting ideas and characters, and give your creativity a boost with a day of fun, stimulating writing exercises. Run by TV drama script editor, producer and script consultant PHIL SHELLEY with guest speaker REGINA MORIARTY writer of the award-winning MURDERED BY MY BOYFRIEND (BBC).
Course date: 7 February 2016
Deadline: none posted
Source:  Script Consultant e-newlsetter