Category Archives: Original Content

LPB at London Writers’ Week: Social Get-Together and Networking for Writers

As London Writers’ Week comes to an end, join us in the bar for a friendly get-together and the chance to meet other writers.

If you’ve come along to our panel discussion or creative writing workout, this is an opportunity get to know the other writers who have participated in the event. But even if you can’t make those events, you’re welcome to join in to celebrate the conclusion of London Writers’ Week.

If you’re not usually a fan of networking, this is a great chance to connect with other creatives in a friendly and non-competitive environment. And if you’re already a master networker, you’ll be in your element helping other folks make connections!

The LPB Team will also be there, and we’re really looking forward to chatting to our readers – so if there’s more we can do to support you in your writing life, come along and tell us!

This event is for you if: 

  • You’d like to meet other writers
  • You’d like to celebrate the last evening of London Writers’ Week with the London Playwrights Blog
  • You’d like to connect to the team behind LPB

Date/ time:  Saturday 8th July 2017 from 7pm  – 9pm

Location: Central Saint Martins, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA The Tabernacle34 – 35 Powis Square, London, W11 2AY 

Price:  Free!

How to book: here

Check out the full London Writers’ Week listings here.

Photo courtesy of Flickr Commons via Freelancers Union CC License

LPB at London Writers’ Week: Creative Inspiration 2.0: A Practical Workshop for Playwrights

Never stare at a blank page again! If you missed our sold-out workshops last year, this is your chance to get writing in an fun and supportive environment, with something to offer writers at all levels.

There’s no better way to celebrate London Writers’ Week than by putting your pen to use. This two-hour intensive workshop will get your creative juices flowing and leave you armed with a set of inspirational tools to boost your creativity when writing at home.

In this interactive workshop, London Playwrights’ Blog Co-Founders Kimberley Andrews and A.C. Smith put a digital twist on the extensive stash of practical writing exercises they’ve picked up during their lives as workshop participants, playwrights, tutors and workshop leaders.

You’ll have the chance to do some spontaneous writing, share your work with other members of the group and gain constructive feedback on your ideas.

Stick around in the bar afterwards to celebrate the end of London Writers’ Week and chat with the workshop leaders and your fellow writers!

(Also, have a look at our panel discussion just before this event, which will look at the best strategies for writers to make the most of what the digital world has to offer in creating their own work.)

Preparation: none, just bring what you need to take notes (paper/pen) – and be prepared to share your work in a group setting.

This event is for you if…

  • You’re interested in finding new strategies to create your own work
  • You’re curious about the new opportunities the digital world has created
  • You want to get practical advice from emerging writers who are successfully self-producing

Date:  Saturday 8th July 2017 from 5pm  –7pm

Location: Central Saint Martins, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA The Tabernacle34 – 35 Powis Square, London, W11 2AY 

Price: £5 for normal bookings – but LPB will shortly be announcing a discount code, so watch this space!

How to book: here

Check out the full London Writers’ Week listings here.

Photo courtesy of Kevin Gong via Flickr Commons CC License

 

LPB at London Writers’ Week: Making Your Own Work in the Digital Age: A Panel Discussion

How do you build a thriving creative life in the digital age? Come along to find out!

This discussion, hosted by A.C. Smith, Co-Founder of London Playwrights’ Blog and Director of London Playwrights’ Workshop, will bring together a panel of emerging creatives who are working in unique ways to successfully create work in the digital age. You will hear the strategies that worked for them and gain ideas on how to apply these in your own practice. The session will end with an audience Q&A.

The panel is focused on writing for the theatre, but writers from all backgrounds are welcome.

This event is for you if: 

  • You’re interested in finding new strategies to create your own work
  • You’re curious about the new opportunities the digital world has created
  • You want to get practical advice from emerging writers who are successfully self-producing

Date/ time: Saturday 8 July 2017 (3pm – 4.30pm)

We’d also really encourage you to stick around for our Creative Writing workout and get-together for writers which will happen following this event.

Location: Central Saint Martins, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA The Tabernacle34 – 35 Powis Square, London, W11 2AY 

Price:  £5 for normal bookings – but LPB will shortly be announcing a discount code, so watch this space!

How to book: here

Check out the full London Writers’ Week listings here.

Photo courtesy of Idealisms via Flickr Commons CC License

Want to work with LPB? We’re recruiting!

Are you interested in getting hands-on experience working for a non-profit arts startup?  Come and join the LPB Team… 

London Playwright’s Blog is in the process of expanding our team, to provide even more great content for our readers and community.

We’re interested in hearing from self-starters with a passion for writing and interest in leading within an online community.

The Roles

LPB is currently looking for people for two new roles:

Editor:

Help us grow our content, write original pieces and oversee commissions, and contribute to the creative growth of the blog.
Click to read more
.

Intern:

Hear about the latest news first and gain experience writing online by contributing to our opportunities postings.
Click to read more.

Everyone on the LPB team currently works on a volunteer basis, and that would also be the case for these roles, which are both unpaid.

While both these roles have deadline-driven responsibilities, the work can be done in a flexible way from home at hours that suit you.  So this is a great opportunity to gain new experience while working around your existing commitments.

A sneak preview…

Curious about what it’s really like working with LPB?  Read this post from our former Intern Hector Dyer, who played a key role in supporting our opportunities posting and events, and has since created work at the Barbican Centre and for New Diorama’s Incoming Festival with Bellow Theatre.

Apply!

Be sure to send your application in to jobs@londonplaywrightsblog.com by the deadline on Friday 23 June 2017 at 5pm if you’re interested.

London Playwrights’ Workshop welcomes people of all backgrounds.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Image: The company of the 2016 Dark Horse Festival, Eulanda Shead Photography.

Behind the Scenes at LPB: An Intern’s Inside Look

 LPB’s Former Intern Hector Dyer shares his story on what it’s really like working at London Playwrights’ Blog.   Want to work with us?  Check out our current job postings!

My first proper day with London Playwrights Blog was a very literal case of learning on the job.

Despite plenty of phone calls and email correspondence, I met the team properly amidst all of us running around with frantic excitement on the morning of Dark Horse Festival.

Not only was it the best way to feel involved and get myself up to speed but it was also fantastic to understand what LPB is all about. Dark Horse Festival was a day of new writing with some phenomenal and provocative scripts displaying a wealth of talent and important voices to be heard. There was an industry audience in the afternoon and a public one in the evening, with plenty of nip and tucks made throughout the day.

The real eye-opener for me was the sheer support that the LPB team had given to the writers and this runs throughout all of their work; an incredibly generous and welcoming atmosphere to playwrights of any level.

The writers of Dark Horse Festival 2016. Image: Eulanda Shead Photography.

The subsequent months allowed me to learn in a slightly calmer environment but one where the same ethos and passion for new writing takes precedence.

I have since learnt how to use WordPress in spite of my ropey IT skills, written blog content and developed a knack for spotting online opportunities with alarming speed.

My main responsibilities have been to run the uploads of relevant opportunities to the blog, a job which once you get the swing of things becomes pretty speedy.

Whilst it’s obviously a fantastic resource for all playwrights, this job is brilliant for anyone who wants to find the best pockets of the internet, mailing lists, groups and other blogs for playwrights in general. It’s been an excellent learning curve in how to keep your ear close to the ground all the time and make sure that nothing passes you by.

On a practical level, getting to know the ropes of WordPress is hugely important. Anyone who’s wishing to set-up their own blog or website but isn’t sure how to really needs to get lessons from LPB Director A.C. Smith a.k.a. Alli! She can vouch for me when I say I was a total and utter novice in this regard at first but Alli ensured that a programme which looks fiendish initially has since become second nature.

A.C. Smith and Kimberley Andrews at Dark Horse Festival 2016. Image: Eulanda Shead Photography.

The other great thing about learning this way is that you can go straight in to contributing to a blog which has been established for a number of years – there are a lot of past examples to reference and you’re not trying to build something from scratch.

I was also able to help out at workshops run by Alli and Kimberley – running the Front of House and generally being an extra pair of hands in the sessions. It’s another good way of meeting people in this field, making connections and understanding what it takes to put on practical hands-on help for writers.

Overall it’s been a brilliant team to be part of and for anyone looking to gain some experience in the literary world I can’t recommend it enough.

The true testament of why I’ve enjoyed my time so much though is fully down to the people involved.

All of the team have been unfailingly friendly and welcoming, totally understanding of any personal commitments and truly focused on doing the best for everyone involved.

In a short time, with plenty of career advice from the LPB team, it’s been a perfect stepping stone to future projects!

Since finishing his internship, Hector Dyer has gone on to create performance work at the Barbican Centre and for New Diorama’s Incoming Festival with Bellow Theatre. You can follow him on Twitter at @HectorTDyer.

Cover image: Kazu End

Intern sought for London Playwrights’ Blog

Interested in learning about blogging and supporting playwrights? We want to hear from you!

London Playwrights Workshop is seeking an intern to support the work of London Playwrights Blog.

The post is ideally suited to an emerging writer interested in learning about blogging and getting involved with a non-profit company during its startup stage.

About the job: The role will primarily focus on supporting LPB in finding and posting opportunities and producing the weekly opportunities roundup. For a person with the right interests and experience, there may also be opportunities to write additional content for the site.  The role may involve other administrative tasks, according to the needs of the organisation.  There will also be opportunities to become involved with the exciting new projects we’ve got coming up in the next few months.

Key Skills:

  • Confident writing skills
  • Reliable personality
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Excellent spelling/grammar
  • Proactive and able to work independently
  • Able to follow a writing style guide

We’re looking for someone with a keen interest in playwriting and the new writing industry, although you do not need to have worked in this area before.

No previous experience of blogging or WordPress is required, as training will be provided in these areas.

You must be 18 or older to apply for this role.

What you’ll get out of it: 

  • Training in how to blog and use WordPress software
  • Your byline included on London Playwrights’ Blog
  • Excellent knowledge of the new writing landscape in London
  • Firsthand experience of working in a theatre non-profit
  • Hands-on experience at key events, including London Writers’ Week

Hours/Duration:  6-8 hours per week (approx).  The hours are flexible and designed to work around other professional and personal commitments, as the majority of the work can be completed from home. As long as deadlines are met, you can work when you please!

The role requires a four month commitment to the blog, from July-October 2017.

Payment: This post is unpaid. London Playwrights Blog is run on a voluntary basis by its staff and writers, and this applies to the Intern role as well.

What to submit:  Please send us:

How to apply: Send your application materials to jobs@londonplaywrightsblog.com, including the job title in the email subject.

Because blogs are deadline-driven, producing polished and accurate work to schedule is the most essential component of this role. Should you be shortlisted, we’ll ask for a reference who can speak to your capabilities and strengths in these areas. Shortlisted applicants will also be asked to complete a short exercise to show their aptitude for producing content for our site.

Deadline: Friday 23 June 2017 at 5pm

(And for an inside look at what it’s like working with the LPB team, read this post from our former intern Hector Dyer about what really happens behind the scenes.)

Image: StockSnap.io

Editor sought for London Playwrights’ Blog

Are you a keen blogger with a flair for creating original content? Are you interested in supporting emerging playwrights? Then we want to hear from you!

London Playwrights’ Workshop is seeking an Editor to oversee and expand the original content put out on London Playwrights’ Blog.

The post is ideally suited to an experienced content writer/ blogger with a passion for new writing. Whilst you don’t have to be a playwright to apply, you’ll need to have an in-depth knowledge of the challenges emerging writers face, so that you can create engaging content for our readers.

About the job: The Editor will take a leadership role in programming and delivering all creative content for the London Playwrights Blog website.

The role will involve commissioning original content, liaising with writers to ensure content is delivered and editing their work. Working closely with the London Playwrights’ Blog team, you’ll be expected to produce your own original content and respond to the needs and interests of our online readers.

The Editor would be responsible for designing and executing an editorial calendar of original content, with support from the other members of the artistic team.

This is an exciting opportunity for someone looking for the opportunity to put their own stamp on the editorial voice of a digital publication. We are planning on making updates to the site later this year, and the Editor would have the opportunity to play a key role in providing input for this redesign.

Key skills: Previous experience of writing original content is essential.

The right candidate will have excellent editing skills and a sharp eye for detail, as well as the creative vision required to deliver engaging content that is consistent with our brand. You must be highly motivated and to be able to work to tight deadlines. You’ll also need excellent communication skills in order to work well as part of our team and the content writers you will be looking after.

Previous experience of WordPress or other blogging software is expected.  An affinity for design and ability to use images and graphics effectively in their content would be highly desirable.

We would also be interested in hearing from someone with ideas about how to integrate other digital content (video, etc) into our editorial offerings, although creating written content currently makes up the primary responsibilities for this role.

You must be 18 or older to apply for this role.

What you’ll get out of it: 

  • The opportunity to put your creative stamp on LPB content and help steer the future direction of the blog
  • Access to a dedicated readership numbering of thousands
  • Experience commissioning content and working with other writers
  • A new platform for your own writing on London Playwrights’ Blog
  • An opportunity to expand your professional network, both online and through LPB events
  • First-hand experience working closely with the founders at a non-profit arts startup
  • The chance to make a genuine difference to people in the new writing community

Hours/Duration:  6-8 hours per week (approx).  The hours are flexible and designed to work around other professional and personal commitments, as the majority of the work can be completed from home. As long as deadlines are met, you can work when you please!

We are looking for someone who can commit to the role for at least six months and preferably someone who wants to make the role ‘their own’ and work with us on a permanent basis.

Payment: This post is unpaid. London Playwrights Blog is run on a voluntary basis by its staff and writers, and this currently applies to the Editor role as well.

What to submit:  Please send us:

  • Your CV
  • A cover letter explaining why you’re interested in working with LPB and why you think you’re right for the role
  • Three links to previous work/clippings demonstrating your experience

Please also include an equal opportunities monitoring form if you are comfortable supplying this information.  (Why do we ask for this information? Click if you’re curious!)

How to apply: Send your application materials to jobs@londonplaywrightsblog.com, including the job title in the email subject.

Because our website is essentially ‘the face’ of our organisation, it’s important that you can demonstrate a strong track record for creating high quality work. Should you be shortlisted, we’ll ask for a reference who can speak to your capabilities and strengths in these areas.  We may also ask you to complete a short written exercise.

Deadline: Friday 23 June 2017 at 5pm

(And for an inside look at what it’s like working with the LPB team, read this post from our former intern Hector Dyer about what really happens behind the scenes.)

Image: Aaron Mello

Taking matters into her own hands: Tamara von Werthern on putting women’s voices onstage 

After noticing that her plays were getting programed by female producers, playwright Tamara von Werthern wondered if she could help make opportunities for other underrepresented playwrights. In this guest post, she shares her journey into founding Fizzy Sherbet and creating new opportunities for women writers.

2016 was a bit of a shit year in many respects, but for me, it was surprisingly productive. After concentrating on developing my full-length play almost exclusively for several years, I decided to write and send out some new short plays parallel to my efforts. My youngest child had started nursery in January which gave me three hours each week to write. And somehow, by sending things to every opportunity going, I managed to have five different new short plays performed or staged as readings throughout the year. It was such a joy to turn up at a venue, sit in the audience, and watch my play unfold without having lifted a finger to put it there (apart from clicking ‘send’ of course).

A funny thing I had noticed was that all the producers, programmers and directors, who had picked my plays and decided to include them, were women. I wondered if it had something to do with my subject matters, with the predominantly female casts, or maybe the fact that the female experience, whatever that may be, is quite central to my work. It might have been a coincidence, but I was intrigued.

Being exposed through my work at Nick Hern Books to Tonic Theatre (we publish Lucy Kerbel as well as her excellent Platform series of plays with large female casts), I was also keenly aware of the imbalance of female vs male playwrights in the UK. Just under a third of writers of original work for the stage produced are female (according to the latest British Theatre Repertoire Report), and the gender disparity gets worse the higher up you go, so that in the West End there is the lowest percentage of female writers represented on stage.

But then it dawned on me that while I have been lamenting the fact that I have it harder to get my plays on than my male colleagues (statistically speaking), I was also in a really good position to be part of changing this trend. It’s easier than you might think to take matters into your own hands.

Fizzy Sherbet, a new writing initiative exclusively for women writers was born when I mentioned the idea to the mother of one of my children’s friends, Olivia Trench, over a coffee/playdate. Olivia happens to also be Drama Development Executive at Eleven Film, and her enthusiastic encouragement (as well as her offer to share the reading!) brought the idea a step closer to reality.

Both Olivia and I read a lot of plays in our respective jobs and we felt confident that we would be able to pull it off together. When Lily McLeish, who is a wonderful theatre director and a passionate advocate of gender equality in the theatre came on board, we started to get even more excited. Lily has experience of directing as Katie Mitchell’s associate in large venues (she most recently worked with her on Cleansed at the National Theatre), and as an accomplished director in her own right. Lily and I have been working together for a while now, and I know that she is excellent on text work, so I thought – this is shaping up pretty good! This also gave us a great grounding to begin approaching potential venues.

When we were then offered the Hackney Attic, a lovely cabaret-style venue above the Hackney Picturehouse, where one of my shorts was shown in 2015, as a venue, there was no holding back. We launched Fizzy Sherbet with a Facebook page, and were amazed by the response. Not only did the plays pour in and we received over 200 submissions, but they were also accompanied by messages of gratitude, expressions of delight at the existence of a new initiative supporting this cause and offers of friendship all around.

It was all rather heart-warming and encouraging. And what a treasure trove we had opened!

We read plays on space travel, on scientific discoveries, on the Iranian revolution; plays set in supermarkets, in the sky, under the surface of a lake. We read plays that were heartbreakingly sad and ones that made us laugh out loud. Plays about porn and about dying parents. Political plays, personal plays and plays that were both. The characters included every age, gender definition and even characters from the animal kingdom. It was an enriching and eye-opening experience. Every time we had put the kids to bed, brewed some coffee and opened our laptops, there was a tingle of excitement at what we would discover this time.

When we had first discussed how we wanted to run Fizzy Sherbet, our concern went beyond female playwrights, to the related issue of gender inequality on stage. We wanted to encourage the creation of more interesting, varied and gratifying parts for women to play. When we counted up the characters of the plays we read we found that across the board two thirds of characters were women and one third men.

We were very excited and and hugely encouraged to discover that in this case an exclusively female group of playwrights without any steering in regards of subject matter, delivered a great variety of writing but with a clear natural predominance of female characters. This made us wonder: could the predominance of male characters on our stages might simply be led back to the fact that currently there are more male playwrights being performed in the UK than female?

In our case, simply supporting female writers was indeed part of the solution.

Fizzy Sherbet took place at Hackney Attic on 24th January at 7.30. see: https://www.picturehouses.com/cinema/Hackney_Picturehouse/film/fizzy-sherbet-plays

 

Gifts & Gear: The Best Stuff for Writers in January 2017

‘Gifts & Gear’ is a new monthly series where a playwright shares their top recommendations for writers.

BONUS: This is a really easy way to support LPB and keep our blog running without  any cost to you!  If you do your Amazon shopping this month by clicking through our links, a small portion of the sale will benefit LPB, at no extra charge to you.  (And you don’t even have to buy what we recommend – it works for anything!)  Read on for the details!

For January 2017, our Gifts & Gear recommendations are from A.C. Smith, Director of London Playwrights Workshop and co-founder of this blog. She’s won writing awards from the RSC and Soho Theatre and is currently working on a new piece for the Bush Theatre’s Emerging Writers Group.

Read on to find out what she relies on to keep her writing going:

 1. Stainless Steel Magnetic Board

“If you’re a visual thinker, this can be a lifesaver. I wanted a whiteboard for ages to be able to get ideas out on, but didn’t feel very creatively inspired by the ugly, plasticky look.

This is great because it lets me make notes directly on the surface and post research or inspiration in the same place with magnets. This has been a big help for my current project.

I’d really recommend it for any writer looking for something a bit more dynamic than a computer screen or a blank page.”

Master of Boards Stainless Steel Magnetic Memo Board – 60x40cm (£28.99)

Set of 12 Stainless Steel Magnets (£13.95)

2. The Seven Basic Plots by Christopher Booker

“This book is my writing secret weapon. If you attended a workshop or have done script consulting with me, there’s a good chance you’ll have heard me mention it. I know if I’m hitting the beats outlined in a ‘Rags to Riches’ story, for example, that structure is going to work. (And if I’m not able to hit them, I probably haven’t been honest enough with myself yet about what kind of story I’m trying to tell.)

Christopher Booker simplifies the core ingredients that go into a compelling story, while providing painstaking detail about the narrative structure of a wide range of examples. If you liked Into The Woods or other similar Jungian-based books, this should be right up your alley. Booker draws on a similar archetypal framework, but with a bit more creativity and openness to subversive twists, in my opinion.

It’s the size of a doorstop, but he provides a neat, page-long summary at the end of each plot structure, so you really only have to dip in as much as you’d like to. (And if you think it’s too fat for your bookshelf, you can always get the e-book!)”

Paperback – The Seven Basic Plots by Christopher Booker (£12.91)

E-Book Version (£11.51)

3. The Clean House And Other Plays by Sarah Ruhl

“Sarah Ruhl is a fantastic American playwright whose work has been produced on Broadway; she won a MacArthur Genius Grant a few years back, but is less well known this side of the pond.

What I love about her plays is the way she combines the mundane details of life with a wild, visual imagination. She’s not afraid to stretch the limits of theatricality. In one play, a man braves a snowstorm to cut down the tree of life; in another, there is a chorus of stones. (That’s right, rocks that come to life and speak.)

Several years ago I received this book as a Christmas gift, and read the entire collection on the plane flight home (instead of sleeping) – all the plays except one, because the experience of reading her work  was so beautiful I didn’t want it to end. I waited a year before dipping into the last one, and it provided comfort and inspiration on a really crappy day. This is a great collection, and it has pride of place on my bookshelf.”

The Clean House And Other Plays by Sarah Ruhl (£15.99)

E-book version (£9.72)

4. Pilot G-Tec C4 Rollerball Pen 0.4mm


“These are the best pens in the world and no one will convince me otherwise. Yes, like many writers I’m a bit of a pen fanatic, and I do like to vary my choice of writing implement on my mood. BUT, this is the pen I find myself returning to over and over again, and use probably 80% of the time.

Why do I love it? Great ink flow, comfortable grip, and a really fine line – which makes it much easier to decipher notes written in a hurry or in the back of a darkened theatre.

Bonus tip: When one of my plays is rehearsing, I devote a different pen colour to each reading or rehearsal – the lines that were great in the first reading may feel clunky by the last rehearsal (or vice versa) and this is a really easy way to keep track of what I was thinking and when. Plus, changing colours is just more fun! They come in a huge range including red, blue, green, orange, violet, and more.”

Pilot G-Tec C4 Rollerball Pen 0.4mm Pack of 3 (Pack of 3 – £6.35, Single pen –  £3.57, Box of 12 – £20.89, )

5. Fingerless Gloves


“If I’m 100% honest, this last pick is aspirational – something I want to get rather than something I already have. Because there is nothing as miserable as writing when your fingers are so cold it hurts (been there, done that).

I was in Budapest this December and I came across a woman weaving in one of the Christmas markets, wearing fingerless gloves. I tried to sympathise with her about how cold it must be, but she said actually the gloves were great and her fingers stayed quite warm. If they’re good enough to survive the Hungarian winter, they must be warm enough for my drafty London flat. So that’s what’s going in my Amazon basket this January!”

WomenFLOSO® Ladies/Womens Thinsulate Thermal Fingerless Winter Gloves (3M 40g) (£5.99)

Men: FLOSO® Mens Thinsulate Thermal Fingerless Gloves (3M 40g) (£6.95)

 

Image: MissMessie via Flickr Commons CC Licence

Happy New Year from London Playwrights Workshop!

So, here we are – 2017! Firstly, we’d like to wish you all a happy new year and say a huge thanks for all your support last year.

2016 saw our blog and London Playwrights’ Workshop grow and grow: from producing our first festival of new writing as part of London Writers’ Week, to having the pleasure of working with lots of you on our workshops. Over 3000 of you now follow us on Twitter and our round-up of opportunities seems to get bigger and brighter every week. We couldn’t do any of this without your continued support!

Like you, no doubt, we’ve got big plans in store for 2017. Watch this space in the coming months for a whole host of exciting things LPW will be working on this year. As always, we’ll be bringing you the latest opportunities, offering you an array of useful and creative workshops and doing our best to support the emerging writers of London – and beyond.

And what about you? Perhaps 2017 will be the year you write your first play, finally re-draft that piece you’ve been putting off for ages, or even produce your own show?

Well, to kick start those writing goals, London Playwrights’ Workshop has come up with a bumper programme of writing courses for the new year. From creative workshops to give you a boost of inspiration, to practical classes which focus on professional skills and getting your work on stage – we’ve got all bases covered for the emerging writer in London. You can check them all out (and of course, book your place!) here.

And don’t forget, our Script Consulting Service runs all year round if you’d prefer some one-to-one support.

Wishing you all a successful year of writing!
The LPW Team

Photo credit: Alexander Baxavanis via Flickr Commons